News

75% of Britons back agree to vote on assisted dying while 80% want to debate before the 2024 election

A YouGov poll also found that eight out of 10 people want the Government to debate the issue before the next election in 2024.

Nurse holding senior woman's hand
A survey shows three-quarters of Britons want their MPs to vote ‘yes’ on assisted dying

Three-quarters of Britons want their MPs to vote “yes” on assisted dying,
a survey revealed.

The YouGov poll also shows that eight in 10 want the Government to debate the issue before the next election in 2024.

It comes as colleagues tonight debate whether Congress should take its own time to consider dying support laws.

If passed, Lord Forsyth’s amendment to the Health and Care Bill would require Number 10 to present a supported Dying Bill to Parliament within one year.

The former Scottish Conservative Party minister changed his mind to support the death of his father after his father died of bladder cancer in 2020, criticizing him for opposing previous Bills.







Tory, former Cabinet Minister, Lord Forsyth of Drumlean speaking at the House of Lords
(

Image:

PA)

He and campaigners have called for a full Congressional debate on the topic, with a petition of nearly 50,000 signatures.

A recent private member’s bill, introduced by Baron Meacher to legalize assisted dying from a terminal illness, was read for a second time.

However, it is now feared that it will not progress beyond the Commission phase.

Campaigners say there isn’t enough time to debate the nearly 200 panel amendments.

Opponents of hospice support believe it can make vulnerable people feel pressured to end their lives early for fear of becoming a caretaker burden.

Lord Forsyth of Drumlean said: “My correction is not at all on the merits of the case for legalizing assisted death.

“It’s about making sure this Parliament has the opportunity to properly debate this issue.”

In Scotland, a Supported Bill proposal recently became the subject of a consultation.

The responses are being analyzed before the draft law is reviewed and scrutinized by the Parliamentary Committee.

I want to end my sister’s pain

A man who considers strangling his sister to save her from a painful death is calling on the Government to properly debate assisted dying.

David Drew, 57, and Caroline watched in horror as their mother Pat battled a motor disorder before dying at the age of 52.

So when Caroline was diagnosed with COPD 34 years later, they knew what to expect.

David revealed how much it took when he watched his sister, 59, go missing in 2012. She lost the ability to speak, suffered severe weight loss, became immobile and was transferred to a workhouse.

Writing for the Mirror, David, of Bromley, Kent, said: “I visited her shortly before her passing.






David Drew and Caroline in 2001

“While sitting by her bed, I seriously considered putting a pillow over her face to end her pain.

“But if I had, I could have been charged with murder. If this country had a law to safely assist the dead, she could have gone at a time of her choosing.”

Supporting Lord Forsyth’s amendment, David said: “Dignity in Dying has launched a petition calling on the Government to take time to debate this important human rights issue.

“I ask you to sign the petition so that no terminally ill person has to face death like my mother and sister. They deserve better. ”

You can sign the petition this.

Read more

Read more

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/75-brits-back-yes-vote-26487155 75% of Britons back agree to vote on assisted dying while 80% want to debate before the 2024 election

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button