According to the report, one in four felt cheated after buying a product promoted by an influencer

According to a new report, nearly a quarter of consumers who bought a product after it was promoted by a social media influencer felt cheated after the purchase.

The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (CCPC) survey outlined the public perception of influencers in Ireland.

The study showed that 78 percent of consumers surveyed are aware of the existence of influencers online, with 29 percent saying they follow some on social media.

The majority of respondents said they don’t follow influencers, instead following “interactive celebrities” or “people of interest online.”

However, only 10 percent of respondents trust information from social media influencers.

Despite the Irish public’s low level of trust in influencers, 66pc had bought something that was mentioned by an influencer on their social media channels.

However, 24 percent of this cohort later regretted their purchase and admitted they felt misled by the influencer’s advertising. This figure represents about 4.6 per cent of Ireland’s total adult population.

Beginning next year, the CCPC and ASAI will provide new guidance on labelling, private label products and reposts

According to Catríona Cahill, Director of Research and Market Insights at CCPC, the types of products labeled were a “mixed bag”. In it, she said there was “a high level of beauty and fashion” and games.

Those who regretted their purchase said they chose to unfollow the influencer rather than report him to a relevant regulator.

Consumers were particularly unsure of influencers who exchanged information about financial products and cryptocurrencies.

This was especially evident among people who knew the influencer had no experience in the world of finance or investing.

The CCPC also found that almost half of influencers’ advertising content was not labeled as advertising.

This was particularly evident when reposting content from brands that influencers had collaborated with, as well as posting links leading to external websites.

Even with content flagged as sponsored or promotional material, inconsistencies have been found in the way influencers flag it.

The CCPC attributed this to influencers following the instructions of brands who paid for the post, rather than referring to Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland (ASAI) guidance.

In 2007, the ASAI established rules for labeling commercial content. Beginning next year, the CCPC and ASAI will provide new guidance on labelling, private label products and reposts.

This move towards greater awareness of obligations will help influencers “deal with brands, maintain trust and avoid breaking the law,” according to the CCPC.

She also said if those steps are ineffective in tackling consumer law violations, she will work to strengthen her powers, including the ability to impose fines.

The group will also launch its own video series to educate Irish consumers about cryptocurrencies and what factors to consider before investing.

“It is critical that platforms, brands, influencers and the agents understand their responsibilities and comply with the law,” said CCPC Member Kevin O’Brien.

https://www.independent.ie/business/irish/one-in-four-felt-deceived-after-buying-product-promoted-by-an-influencer-report-reveals-42214835.html According to the report, one in four felt cheated after buying a product promoted by an influencer

Fry Electronics Team

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