Chocolate lovers can spend €36 on Easter eggs, with most buying six eggs or more as we look forward to the first Easter without Covid restrictions

Irish people will spend an average of €36 on chocolate eggs this year, with half buying six chocolate eggs or more, as families look forward to spending their first Easter together free of pandemic restrictions.

A survey has found that Easter celebrations will be different than last year, as over 60 per cent of individuals and 70 per cent of families plan to take advantage of the eased restrictions by “eating together at home”.

Overall, people in Ireland will spend an average of €36 on chocolate eggs this year, according to environmental group Repak.

And half will buy six chocolate eggs or more, with 27 percent planning to spend more than last year.

Meanwhile, Irish households are expected to recycle enough waste over Easter to fill the Aviva stadium to the roof more than three and a half times.

Irish residents are expected to recycle over 58,000 tonnes of packaging waste, an 18 per cent increase compared to Easter 2021, according to Repak.

She urges the public to know “what can be recycled” and “recycle properly” in the coming days.

As of last year, all plastics can go into the recycling bin, which Repak research found 35 percent of people are unaware of.

“This Easter, Repak calls on the public to recycle all plastics and especially packaging from Easter eggs and gifts,” the organization said.

“Cardboard boxes, plastic molds and clean aluminum foil are just a few of the many items households use over Easter, all of which can end up in the recycling bin clean, dry and loose.

“Ireland currently recycles 31% of all plastic, but that needs to increase to 50% by 2025 to meet the plastics recycling targets that the EU has set for the coming years. By being a good egg at Easter and recycling properly, the public will help Ireland achieve the goal.”

Research by Repak shows that giving chocolate Easter eggs remains a popular tradition. 54pc plan to do so, however buying alternative gifts is becoming more common and 22pc will be giving a gift other than chocolate.

Of those who want to give something different, 28 pieces buy a different confectionery, 23 pieces give away toys and 17 pieces surprise a loved one with baked goods.

A study conducted by Repak found that sustainability is particularly important for 18-24 year olds when choosing an all-important chocolate egg, with 15 percent saying it influences their decision the most, compared to an average of 10 percent older generations.

Repak CEO Séamus Clancy said Easter is a particularly busy time for waste companies across Ireland, who receive a “heavy influx of packaging waste” over the weekend.

He added: “By putting all recyclable items in the recycling bin clean, dry and loose, we support their work. Now that all plastic can go into the recycling bin, we have a great opportunity to meet ambitious future plastics recycling targets by the EU.

“With 19pc expecting to receive at least 3 chocolate eggs this Easter, it’s important to take the time to understand what can be recycled and how to do it properly. Recycling all plastic clean, dry and loose in addition to other recyclable items is a great first step in helping Ireland increase its recycling rates.”

https://www.independent.ie/news/environment/chocolate-lovers-to-splurge-36-on-easter-eggs-with-most-buying-six-eggs-or-more-as-we-look-forward-to-first-easter-without-covid-restrictions-41558738.html Chocolate lovers can spend €36 on Easter eggs, with most buying six eggs or more as we look forward to the first Easter without Covid restrictions

Fry Electronics Team

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