Christine McVie: musician whose vocals and songwriting are at the heart of Fleetwood Mac’s global success

Christine McVie, deceased aged 79, was a singer-songwriter for Fleetwood Mac.

he saw the band through the first time they became a British blues band and then as part of a successful line-up in subsequent years in the US, when her writing and singing made the backbone for a highly personal album rumor (1977), a musical autobiography listing the emotional and drug-filled lives of the five band members.

A highly trained pianist with a deep, smoky alto voice, she initially joined Fleetwood Mac in 1970, a year after marrying the band’s bass player, John McVie.

At this stage based in the UK and still part of the British blues scene, Fleetwood Mac had just lost their founding member, Peter Green. Christine McVie became a key member (and initially the only female) of the group.

She recorded three albums with them, before reluctantly agreeing to move to the US with her husband and the band’s drummer, Mick Fleetwood, in an attempt to revive Fleetwood Mac’s waning popularity.

Within a year, they had recruited two American musicians, Lindsey Buckingham, an established guitarist and singer-songwriter, and his girlfriend and musical partner, Stevie Nicks.

Buckingham and Stevie Nicks joined Christine McVie as the band’s lead singer and songwriter.

From the very beginning, Christine McVie realized they had found a different new sound.

“I started playing ‘Say You Love Me,’” she recalls, “and when I got to the chorus, they started singing along with me and fell in love right away. I heard this incredible sound — the voices of the three of us — and thought to myself, ‘Is this me singing?’ I can’t believe how wonderful this three-vocal harmony is.”

The three singers also complement each other in terms of songwriting and performance styles.

Christine McVie is the most underrated, and when she’s on stage, she’s always sitting at her keyboard. Her songs are simple, direct and delightful, often about the joys and pains of love. Her fellow singer-songwriters are mystical and ethereal (Nicks) and highly tense but technically controlled (Buckingham) respectively.

New lineup to release album Fleetwood Mac in 1975. In addition to popular songs written and performed by Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, the album also featured “Over My Head” and “Say You Love Me” by Christine McVie, both of which reached the Top 20.

But it was rumortwo years later, became one of the best-selling albums of all time.

rumor chirping with harmonious tunes, much of which captures the increasingly chaotic discord among the band members.

Video of the day

During the recording of the album, Buckingham and Stevie Nicks broke up and Christine McVie began an affair with Fleetwood Mac lighting director Curry Grant, which inspired her to write “You Make Loving Fun.” She also wrote “Songbird,” about her love for her band members, despite their drug and alcohol-fuelled lives.

Then she said, “Music is everything we live for. “It’s what holds us together while everything else is falling apart. We all live in this dream world, using too much drugs and drinking too much, all busy with divorces and struggles with each other.”

‘Don’t stop’ from rumor The album was an upbeat message to her ex-fiancé, John McVie. It was later used by Bill Clinton in 1992 as the theme song for his presidential campaign.

Towards the end of the tour to announce rumorMcVies is divorced.

But despite the complicated nature of the relationship between all of the band members, Fleetwood Mac went on to record several albums together including Fang (1979), illusion (1982), and Tango in the night (1987), which featured two of the best-selling singles, “Little Lies” and “Everywhere”, written by Christine McVie.

In the mid-1990s, Christine McVie began to get tired of touring, and after the death of her father while she was on tour and the breakdown of her second marriage, in 1998, she announced Dad is retiring permanently from Fleetwood Mac. She said the decision was definitive (partly because she had developed a fear of flying), and that she sold her house in Los Angeles and moved back to the UK.

“The moment I set foot on Heathrow,” she recalled in 2004, “it was as if this enormous weight had been lifted from me. I never really wanted to leave England in the first place. When we left to try to find a career in the United States, they assured me it would only last for six months. We are never coming back.”

For the next 16 years, she rarely appeared in public and spent most of her time in her 17th-century home near Canterbury, cooking for her extended family and focusing on her garden and dogs. “I live a very simple life,” she explains, “but that is the life I have chosen.”

But in early 2014, it was announced that 70-year-old Christine McVie would rejoin the band for the tour next fall. “Our songbird is back!” Mick Fleetwood screams ecstatically at their opening concert.

She was sitting, as always, behind the keyboard, her blond hair like silver platinum. Her voice was deeper and more smoky, but still as smooth and melodious as it was four decades ago.

“Honestly, I think it will be a struggle. I was a little nervous,” she said at the time. “The moment you find yourself playing with these amazing musicians and friends, that feeling just disappears. And now I feel completely at ease, really, surprisingly.”

Christine Anne Perfect was born on 12 July 1943 in Bouth, Cumbria, and grew up in Smethwick, near Birmingham, where her father, Cyril was a concert violinist and music instructor. Her mother was a spiritual and faith healer.

Little Christine was introduced to the piano at the age of 4 (her grandfather was an organist at Westminster Abbey) and trained in the classical way until she was 15 years old. But after her brother introduced her to Fats Domino, she switched allegiances and began playing rock’n’roll.

She spent five years studying sculpture at an art college near Birmingham with the goal of becoming an art teacher, during which time she met several musicians who were part of the growing blues scene. UK development.

After joining a local band, Sounds Of Blue, she moved to London, where she worked as a shop dresser before joining Chicken Shack as a keyboardist and singer. cushion.

She spent two years with the band and was eventually promoted to lead vocalist. Her “bluesy” singing style, featured in her version of ‘I’d Rather Go Blind’, won Melodies maker awards in 1969 and 1970. She left Chicken Shack in 1969 to marry John McVie.

Before joining Fleetwood Mac, she recorded a solo album, Perfect Christineand after her success with Fleetwood Mac, the album was re-released under the title Christine’s Legendary Perfect Album. After rejoining Fleetwood Mac, she began writing new material, some of it with Lindsey Buckingham, and in 2017 they released albums Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVietoured the US to promote it.

In the early 1980s, Christine McVie had a bad relationship with Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson. She wrote the song “Love in Store” (1982) about their relationship. “I was very unlucky in love,” she said in 2004. “It was really a drag.”

Like Stevie Nicks (and unlike the male members of Fleetwood Mac), Christine McVie has never had children, and despite periods of hatred and bitterness, the band members always seem to get back together. .

“We laugh a lot,” she explains, “it’s one of the main reasons people get together, marriage, bands or whatever. The ability to laugh at things and yourself is really important.

Her marriage to John McVie broke up in 1978. In 1986, she married keyboardist Eddie Quintela. The marriage broke up in 2003.

Telegraph Communication Company Limited [2022]

https://www.independent.ie/entertainment/music/christine-mcvie-musician-whose-singing-and-songwriting-were-at-the-heart-of-fleetwood-macs-global-success-42193487.html Christine McVie: musician whose vocals and songwriting are at the heart of Fleetwood Mac’s global success

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button