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Clontarf’s major road detour comes into operation in Dublin, council may involve Gardaí if drivers fail to follow the new rules

Traffic appeared to be moving normally around the North Strand area of ​​Dublin this morning as a major road closure to build a segregated cycle lane began.

North Strand Road will be closed to private vehicles on the approach side for about a year while construction of the cycle lane and upgrade of the water mains begins as part of a €62 million project funded by the National Transport Authority.

Outbound lanes are not affected by the diversion.

Today was the first day of the road closure and although traffic flow appeared to be normal, the volume is expected to be higher when schools reopen in the coming weeks.

Private vehicles heading towards North Strand are now being diverted towards Ballybough, but this morning several vehicles were seen ignoring instructions from a construction worker in hi-vis clothing, whose job it was to indicate to drivers which lane they should be in .

Instead, they drove right past him towards town.

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New traffic regulations on Fairview beach as commuters make their way into Dublin city centre. Picture; Gerry Mooney

A spokesman for Dublin City Council said it is hoped that people will follow the rules over time and that Gardai will be brought on board if necessary to oversee the order and enforce the law if necessary.

“We hope the public will bear with us during the construction of this project as there are inevitable delays and disruptions on a project of this magnitude.

“We would like to thank the people who have listened to the message we have been putting out over the past few weeks to discourage people from traveling this particular route and taking other routes into the city to use other modes of transport by bike drive, use buses and walk into the city,” said Victor Coe, chief engineer at Dublin City Council.

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New traffic regulations on Fairview beach as commuters make their way into Dublin city centre. Picture; Gerry Mooney

“We will start the diversion first to see how the public is complying and we are holding ongoing consultations with Gardai, the enforcement agency. If people don’t heed the diversion, we will move to the next step, which is to involve the Gardai and start with the police first, and then enforce the diversion in the long term,” he added.

The council has said work could continue into early 2024 but expect work to be completed sooner.

“The contractor is paid by the mileage worked, not by the time it takes to complete the project,” explained Mr. Coe.

Asked whether schools reopening could create a traffic problem in the coming weeks, Mr Coe said the City Council is constantly monitoring traffic in its traffic control room and using a system that counts the number, volume and movement of cars in the city city ​​monitored.

“This will happen every day over the next few weeks and days. We as officers and engineers within the Council will continue to monitor,” he explained.

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/news/major-clontarf-road-diversion-goes-live-in-dublin-council-may-involve-gardai-if-drivers-dont-obey-new-rules-41896627.html Clontarf’s major road detour comes into operation in Dublin, council may involve Gardaí if drivers fail to follow the new rules

Fry Electronics Team

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