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Cold inside property scam seeing criminals steal your home and secretly sell it

The psychological thriller, Our House, sees Tuppence Middleton play the mother of two children Fi Lawson, who discovers her house has mysteriously exchanged hands without her knowledge.

The psychological thriller, Our House, follows Tuppence Middleton as the mother of two children Fi Lawson, who discovers her house has been mysteriously turned around without her knowledge.
New ITV drama series based on the 2019 Sunday Times best-selling novel by Louise Candlish

A highly sophisticated property scam involving criminals stealing your identity and selling your roof is unfolding in four chilling parts. ITV dramatic.

The psychological thriller, Our House, follows Tuppence Middleton as the mother of two children Fi Lawson, who discovers her house has been mysteriously turned around without her knowledge.

The show is based on a 2019 Sunday Times best-selling novel by Louise Candlish – and despite being a work of fiction, the story is inspired by a real life. property scam case in 2015.

Early victims of the scam discovered their London home had been rented to a fake tenant and then sold on his instructions using fake documents and a third person posing as the owner.

Did this happen to you? Contact: emma.munbodh@mirror.co.uk







The movie is based on a real property fraud case in 2015
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ITV)

Author Louise previously told Criminal Element: “Property is overvalued, and people who happen to be millionaires live in decently average homes.

“At the same time, a whole terrible property fraud industry has sprung up. I really wanted to write about a crime that I had never read through fiction before.”

The scam, often organized by criminal networks, involved defrauding lawyers, real estate agents and the Land Registry.

Once they have your identity, they will claim title rights to your home and change the title to their name, allowing them to make property-secured loans or even sell it.

Last year, the Land Registry revealed it had paid £3.5 million in compensation for fraud and inaccuracies in its register between July 2019 and May. July 2020.







Initial victims of the scam discovered their London home had been rented to a fraudulent tenant and then sold on his instructions using forged documents
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Image:

ITV)

Pastor Mike Hall was in north Wales for work last year when he received a call from neighbours to say someone was at his Luton’s house.

He drove back the next morning on August 21 to explore the key has been changed and a builder is finishing the work inside.

The real estate was stripped of everything, including the carpet, furniture and curtains.

Mr. Hall phoned the police, and the builder left and returned with the new owner’s father, who said he bought the terraced house in July.

He told Mr. Hall: “It is now my property. Now you are trespassing. Get out.”

He told BBC : “I went to the front door, tried the key on the front door, it didn’t work and a man opened the front door for me.

“I pushed him [the builder] aside and have in the property. I really don’t know what he’s doing there. “

An investigation later found a copy of a driver’s license and a bank account in Mr. Hall’s name had been used to sell the home.

The house was sold to a new owner for £131,000.

Land Registry documents show the transaction is complete and that the new buyer is the registered owner of his home, meaning he or she legally owns the property.

Initially, the police told him it was not fraud, despite causing serious concerns about the transaction.

Mr Hall said: “I was shocked – to see the house in such condition I was a bit shocked anyway.

“But then being told by police that they don’t believe a crime has been committed here is just unbelievable.”

“We work with professional carriers, such as attorneys, and rely on them and the checks they perform to detect fraudulent attempts,” the land registry said. to impersonate the owner of the property.

“Despite our efforts, every year we register a very small number of fraudulent transactions.”

HM Land Registry has an online page highlighting tips for home owners on how they can protect their assets from fraud.

A spokesperson said: “There are steps owners can take to protect their property against fraud, such as signing up for HM Land Registry’s free Property Alerts service.”

You can also protect your property by applying to restrict your title documents, preventing the Land Registry from registering a sale or mortgage unless the carrier or attorney determines acknowledge that the application is submitted by you.

In recent months, the Bar Association has also issued warnings about property trading oranges.

The regulator says criminals are targeting property purchases with the aim of tricking people into transferring their home security deposits.

Scams almost always involve criminals posing as the victim’s attorney to trick them into transferring their payments to an account the crooks control.

Law Society President I. Stephanie Boyce said: “We are urging our members to share these flyers with their clients to help protect them from extremely sophisticated and evil schemes. this.

“These frauds can involve huge sums of money and have a devastating lifelong impact on homebuyers and their personal finances. Sex offenders and their clients can all play a part in making it harder to commit crime.”

A home buyer has been duped into handing over £640,000. Emails between buyers and their attorneys have been intercepted by criminals who can collect all information related to the home purchase.

They then used a fake email account (which looked like a lawyer’s account) to request payment. Payment details were provided on the lead solicitor invitation via fake email, and the amount requested was exactly what the buyer was expected to pay.

The victim was then advised by a bona fide attorney that these payments had not been claimed. Most of the money was never recovered, all but written off the victim’s equity and savings, and resulted in the collapse of their purchase.

“Buyers should be extremely vigilant for any changes to payment details and always double-check by calling their attorney before they transfer money, as emails can be intercepted or redirected.” I. Stephanie Boyce added.

Jon Shilland, head of threat fraud at NECC, said: “Payment redirect fraud is on the rise and it’s important to stay ahead of the threat as criminals are targeting homebuyers due to regulation. size of transactions.

“Whenever a client makes a home payment to an attorney, they are highly suspicious of any change in account details or new instructions. Remind them to always check with a trusted known contact and if they have any doubts, don’t transfer the money. “

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/inside-chilling-property-scam-sees-26422344 Cold inside property scam seeing criminals steal your home and secretly sell it

Fry Electronics Team

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