Creepy ‘female vampire’ skeleton discovered with blade at throat to ‘keep her from coming back from the dead’

A CREEPY “female vampire” skeleton was found with a blade at her throat to “stop her coming back from the dead”.

The woman’s remains were unearthed by archaeologists during excavations at a 17th-century cemetery in the village of Pien, Poland.

The remains were unearthed by archaeologists during excavations at a cemetery in Poland

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The remains were unearthed by archaeologists during excavations at a cemetery in PolandCredit: Miroslav Blicharski/Aleksander
She was found with a sickle on her neck to prevent her from coming back from the dead.

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She was found with a sickle on her neck to prevent her from coming back from the dead.Credit: Miroslav Blicharski/Aleksander
The woman wore a silk cap on her head, which indicates high social status

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The woman wore a silk cap on her head, which indicates high social statusCredit: Miroslav Blicharski/Aleksander

She was found with a sickle across her throat and a padlocked toe to “prevent her from coming back from the dead”.

The researchers found that the woman had a silk cap on her head – indicating high social status – and a buck tooth.

Team leader Professor Dariusz Poliński from Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun said the form of the burial was unusual.

He told that Daily Mail: “Ways of protecting oneself from the return of the dead include cutting off the head or legs, laying the deceased face down to bite the ground, burning them, and smashing them with a stone.

“The sickle was not laid flat, but placed on the neck in such a way that the head would most likely have been cut off or injured if the deceased had attempted to stand up.”

He said the padlocked big toe on her left foot supported the theory that she was considered a vampire at the time of her death and likely symbolized “the impossibility of returning.”

In the 11th century, Eastern Europeans began to fear vampires – believing that people who died would fight their way out of graves.

And in the 17th century, after an apparent “outbreak” of vampires, unusual burial practices became common across Poland.

Poliński said suspected vampires were being violently executed across Eastern Europe at the time.

People who died prematurely – such as suicide – were often suspected of vampirism – and their bodies mutilated to prevent them from “rising from the dead”.

The discovery was sent to Torun, where archaeologists will conduct further research.

In 2015, archaeologists in the village of Drewsko, 130 miles away, reportedly found five skeletons similarly buried in a 400-year-old cemetery.

Sickles were found on the throats of a man and a woman, while an elderly woman was spotted with a sickle across her hips.

The researchers said at the time: “In burials, they were a guarantee that the deceased would remain in their graves and thus not harm the living, but they may also have served to protect the dead from evil forces.

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“According to folk wisdom, a sickle gave birth to women, children and the dead from evil spirits.

“It also played a role in rituals developed against black magic and witchcraft.”

https://www.thesun.ie/tech/9350557/female-vampire-skeleton-discovered/ Creepy ‘female vampire’ skeleton discovered with blade at throat to ‘keep her from coming back from the dead’

Fry Electronics Team

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