Dangerous text smishing warns millions of iPhone and Android users – The Irish Sun

IF YOU receive a suspicious text message claiming to be from your bank or courier, think twice before opening it.

Hackers target smartphones around the world by sending messages disguised as coming from a trusted entity.

Hackers target smartphones around the world by sending messages disguised as coming from a trusted entity

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Hackers target smartphones around the world by sending messages disguised as coming from a trusted entityPhoto credit: Getty

By clicking on a link contained in the text, the attackers could gain access to your phone – and possibly your online banking logins.

The shady texts are a form of SMS phishing (smashing), a type of cyber attack that has been gaining popularity lately.

Phishing attacks lure victims to a website that appears to be operated by a trusted entity, such as B. a bank, a social media platform or another service.

However, the website is fake with fake content that aims to give a false sense of security to a victim.

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The fake website may ask the victim to enter sensitive information like a password or email address.

Alternatively, it could encourage the user to download a seemingly harmless app that installs malware on their device.

Smishing – a coinage of SMS and phishing – is a version of the text message attack.

In order to trick people into listening to the URLs, texts are usually disguised as security updates, software or package delivery notifications.

According to Kaspersky cyber security experts: “In short, like most cybercriminals, they aim to steal your personal information, which they can then use to steal money – usually yours, but sometimes your company’s.

“Cyber ​​criminals use two methods to steal this data. They could trick you into downloading malware that installs itself on your phone. This malware might impersonate a legitimate app and trick you into entering sensitive information and send this data to the cyber criminals.

“On the other hand, the link in the smishing message might take you to a fake website where you are asked to enter sensitive personal information that the cyber criminals can use to steal your online ID.”

If you suspect you have been infected, you should contact your bank to check if there has been any suspicious activity on your account.

You should also change all your online passwords as they may be in the hands of hackers now.

It is recommended that you factory reset your phone to rid it of the malware.

Android users should avoid installing apps from third-party websites to protect themselves from shady downloads.

It’s especially important to only install apps from well-known brands like Adobe from trusted places like the Google Play Store.

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https://www.thesun.ie/tech/9503940/warning-iphone-android-users-smishing-texts/ Dangerous text smishing warns millions of iPhone and Android users – The Irish Sun

Fry Electronics Team

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