First look at Brighton’s new £500m hospital building

A NEW hospital building, which will replace the NHS’ oldest acute care unit building, will open early next year as part of a £500m project.

From February, more than 30 wards and departments at Brighton’s Royal Sussex County Hospital will be relocated to the new trauma, teaching and tertiary care building from the neighboring Barry Building, which admitted its first patients in 1828.

General medicine, non-invasive cardiology, and inpatient respiratory and stroke services will move to the new location.

The Argus: The entrance and reception area of ​​the new building is 20 times larger than the existing main entrance in the Barry BuildingThe entrance and reception area of ​​the new building is 20 times larger than the existing main entrance in the Barry Building

The £483million project will treat patients with state-of-the-art facilities, with new operating rooms allowing staff to perform surgeries more effectively and improve the patient experience.

Patients will have five times the space per bed in the wards than in the Barry Building, allowing for more privacy and dignity.

Charlotte Lee, outpatient ear, nose and throat nurse manager at Royal Sussex County Hospital said her colleagues can’t wait to move in and work at the new site.

She said: “We’re already taking our names down to find out who will be working at the weekend to move us all in.

“Maxillofacial is currently in outpatients where the rooms are very small and have connecting doors which is not as good for privacy as we would hope. In the new building we have much better facilities including x-ray facilities for our patients in one ward.

“It’s going to be a lot better for patient travel – taking a patient from here to X-ray and bringing them back is going to be really good.”

The Argus: Charlotte Lee, Head Nurse, in one of the maxillofacial rooms of the new buildingCharlotte Lee, Head Nurse, in one of the maxillofacial rooms of the new building

Space in the building has been allocated with the patient in mind, with wards with similar services or similar needs located close together.

New, larger-capacity operating rooms, along with dedicated neurosurgery and interventional radiography, will also help the health service work through waiting lists that have built up during the pandemic.

Natural light is present throughout the new building, with the main ambulatory imaging waiting room leading to a seafront terrace from the intensive care unit and medical ward, which also offer views over the city and the South Downs.

The Argus: A terrace for patients and staff near the main waiting room of the imaging clinic in the new buildingA terrace for patients and staff near the main waiting room of the imaging clinic in the new building

Due attention has also been given to staff well-being, with more space for staff workspaces, particularly in high-load wards such as critical care.

Tedi Anne Dela Cruz, Ward Manager at the hospital’s Bristol ward, said: “It will have a huge impact on patient care and will be a huge improvement for staff and patients alike.

“We work in the Barry Building, which has provided care for two centuries, which has proved very challenging for us to work in a confined space.

“This space offers patients and their families alike greater dignity and privacy, and efficiency is improved for staff.”

The Argus: Tedi Anne Dela Cruz at one of the beds in the medical department of the new hospital buildingTedi Anne Dela Cruz at one of the beds in the medical department of the new hospital building

A new simulation suite and instructional facilities will be available on the 11th floor of the building to educate the next generation of healthcare professionals, with space making it easier for students and trainee staff to observe and participate in care without compromising a sense of care Crowding arises patients.

In the second phase of development work at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, the Barry Building will be demolished and replaced with a new cancer centre. Work is scheduled to begin in the spring of next year, and patients are expected to be admitted in early 2026.

In a third construction phase, an urgently needed service and logistics yard will be built.

The Argus: The Barry Building, which has served patients for nearly 200 years, is being demolished to make way for a new cancer centerThe Barry Building, which has served patients for nearly 200 years, is being demolished to make way for a new cancer center

Patients, staff and the public are encouraged to come up with a name for the new building, with submissions being accepted by August 28.

Suggestions should be no longer than three words and should be relevant to the wide range of people the hospital serves.

All proposals will be considered, with a final decision being made by the University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust Board.

A spokesman for the Trust said: “While we love to laugh as much as anyone else, names like Hospital McHospital Face will unfortunately not make it through the selection process, I’m afraid.”

The new name will be unveiled towards the end of the year and will complement the building’s history for decades to come as it serves the people of Brighton and Sussex.

People can submit their suggestions at uhsussex.nhs.uk/shareaname.

https://www.theargus.co.uk/news/20609066.first-look-new-500-million-brighton-hospital-building/?ref=rss First look at Brighton’s new £500m hospital building

Fry Electronics Team

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