Food prices here are the second most expensive in the euro zone, and the trend is rising

blank

Food prices in Ireland are the second most expensive in the euro zone.

Compared to the other members of the European Union, food prices here are the third most expensive, according to a new survey by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

Prices here are 17 percent higher than the average in the 27 countries that make up the EU, the CSO said.

Prices of different types of food in Ireland were all above the EU27 average last year, with the exception of fish, which was 3 per cent lower.

Milk, cheese and egg prices were 25 percent above the EU27 average.

The cost of oils and fats was 22 percent higher and bread and cereals were 20 percent more expensive in this country than the European Union average.

Overall, food prices were the second most expensive in the 19 euro area countries and the third most expensive in the 27 countries of the European Union.

This country is the second most expensive country in the Eurozone for alcohol.

And Ireland is the most expensive for tobacco out of 36 countries surveyed by the CSO last year.

Tobacco prices are 145 percent above the EU27 average.

Chief Statistician at CSO Edel Flannery said: “If you look at how the price level of food, drink and tobacco in Ireland compared to other European countries in 2021, Ireland was the second most expensive country in the eurozone and the third most expensive of the 27 European countries Union countries for food with prices 17 percent above the EU27 average.

“Of the 36 countries surveyed, food was most expensive in Switzerland, at 69 percent above the EU27 average, and cheapest in Turkey, at 37 percent below the EU27 average.”

She said if you look at the prices of the different food categories in Ireland, they were all higher than the EU27 average in 2021, with the exception of fish.

Milk, cheese and egg prices in Ireland were 25 per cent higher than the EU27 average, while oils and fats were 22 per cent higher and bread and cereals 20 per cent higher.

For soft drinks, Ireland was the eurozone’s most expensive, along with Malta, and the EU27’s second most expensive in 2021, with prices 37 per cent above the EU27 average, Ms Flannery said.

Norway was the most expensive of the 36 countries for soft drinks.

Prices are 55 percent above the EU27 average, while Turkey was the cheapest, with prices 33 percent below the EU27 average.

Alcohol prices are double the EU average, making Ireland the second most expensive country in the euro zone.

Alcoholic drinks were cheapest in North Macedonia, at 19 per cent below the EU27 average.

For tobacco, Ireland was the most expensive of the 36 countries surveyed last year, Ms Flannery said.

Daragh Cassidy of price comparison site Bonkers.ie said the quality of food and drink in Ireland is generally considered to be high, but that doesn’t make these figures any easier to digest.

“We are constantly led to believe that there is intense competition in the food sector in Ireland. But that seems hard to believe when you look at the prices.

“The impact of government policies and taxation can be clearly seen in the tobacco and alcohol figures, where our prices are miles above the EU average. And the alcohol numbers would have been compiled before the MUP for alcohol was introduced, which has further increased our prices,” Mr. Cassidy said.

https://www.independent.ie/business/personal-finance/food-prices-here-the-second-most-expensive-in-the-eurozone-and-rising-41801226.html Food prices here are the second most expensive in the euro zone, and the trend is rising

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button