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Friends of the Environment present challenge to Government’s Food Vision 2030 strategy

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An environmental group has received permission from the High Court to review judicially the Government’s decision to adopt the 10-year strategy of the agri-food sector.

The Irish Environment Agency (FIE) is seeking to quash the decision to pass, publish or approve its “Food Vision 2030” strategy last year.

The Food Vision 2030 report, published last August, sets out a roadmap for exports to grow from €14 billion to €21 billion by 2030, and projects Ireland to become a “country” world leader in sustainable food systems” during this period.

The agricultural and marine sector plans are developed by an interagency committee of 30 agri-related stakeholders.

Mr. Justice Charles Meenan authorized the FIE on Tuesday to pursue its challenge against strategic adoption. Leave was notified to State respondents who did not object to John Kenny BL’s application, directed by FP Logue Solicitors.

The FIE stated that the plan did not have an adequate environmental impact assessment of the possible impacts of the implementation of the plan. Furthermore, its application does not comply with the requirements under the European Union’s Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive which was transferred to this jurisdiction under the 2004 European Community Regulations. allegations.

In the court documents, the FIE asserted that no good reason was given to choose this strategy over another “reasonable alternative” believed to work better than some. greater than specific environmental objectives.

The FIE objected to a provision of the 2004 regulation that assumed all “reasonable alternatives” to the chosen plan would have to be evaluated equally.

However, the team stated that it was not possible to understand the weighting priorities of an assessment used to score alternatives for each environmental objective. The choice of this plan, the FIE said, was “unreasonable and unreasonable”, as it is believed to have taken into account unrelated considerations and failed to consider other relevant documents.

The group said it anticipates that State respondents will argue that adopting a Food Vision is not Government policy and/or that environmental assessments are voluntary to the extent that any Any errors have no legal consequences.

It noted that a similar argument had been made by the State in another FIE action aimed at blocking the passage of Project Ireland 2040, including the National Development Plan. The Supreme Court last week agreed to consider the FIE’s appeal in this case, which will include a review of the status of the National Development Plan.

In its Food Vision challenge, the FIE stated that any such argument would contravene the language used by State respondents during the environmental assessment and ignore “the implications important policies” stemming from these agricultural strategies.

As well as the order to annul the August 3 decision, the FIE wants various statements from the court, including that Member States were wrong by law by not fully considering reasonable alternatives to the alternative selected for the purposes of the SEA Directive and a provision of the 2004 regulation.

The case against the Government of Ireland, Ireland, the Attorney General and the Minister for Agriculture, Food and Maritime Affairs, has been adjourned for mention in June.

https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/news/courts/friends-of-the-environment-launches-challenge-to-governments-food-vision-2030-strategy-41400134.html Friends of the Environment present challenge to Government’s Food Vision 2030 strategy

Fry Electronics Team

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