Giant Hogweed warning as Tot suffers third-degree burns from ‘Britain’s most dangerous plant’

Hardy Mill Primary School has issued an urgent warning to parents after a schoolchild suffered severe blistering that required hospital treatment

A child suffered horrific burns after touching a giant hogweed plant
A child suffered horrific burns after touching a giant hogweed plant

A 4-year-old child suffered horrific third-degree burns after touching “Britain’s most dangerous plant”.

The boy was playing at Longsight Park in Bolton when the schoolchild died on Saturday April 4th.

She developed severe blisters and required hospital treatment – prompting her elementary school to issue an urgent warning to parents. Manchester evening news reported.

In a statement, Hardy Mill Primary School said: “One of our children was unfortunately exposed to this plant during the school holidays and ended up in hospital with second degree burns.

“Please look out for this plant in your garden and when you are out with your children.

“We have been informed that this plant will definitely grow in Longsight Park.

“It would be helpful to show your children what this plant looks like so they can avoid contact with it.”







The plant can cause serious health problems and severe skin irritation as its toxins penetrate deep into cells
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Picture:

(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Dubbed Britain’s ‘most dangerous plant’, giant hogweed can cause serious health problems and severe skin irritation as its toxins penetrate deep into cells.

The weeds can grow up to 20 feet tall, while each giant hogweed plant can spread over a range of about two meters, making them highly invasive.

Giant hogweed belongs to the Apiaceae family, which also includes plants such as parsley, carrot, parsnip, cumin, and coriander.

Officially known as Heracleum mantegazzianum, but which can be noxious and grows continuously, the weed was introduced to Britain from Eurasia in the 19th century.

Its sap is one of the most notable parts of the plant, with its thick green stem flecked with purple and white hairs.

With thick green leaves that can grow up to 1.50 m wide, giant hogweed lives up to its name.

Experts are urging people to be aware of the plant’s hairy sap, where the danger lies and which contains organic toxic chemical compounds called furocoumarins.

It’s easy for people to get annoyed with the giant hogweed without realizing it, as the sap’s toxins make themselves felt in large ways, causing burns and scars.

In the short term, people may experience blisters and rashes, as well as painful sores.

However, the long-term consequences are more dramatic as people face potential disfigurement or long-lasting purple spots on their skin.

Those worst affected could experience skin irritation even months or years after exposure to the plant.

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/giant-hogweed-warning-tot-suffers-27234455 Giant Hogweed warning as Tot suffers third-degree burns from 'Britain's most dangerous plant'

Fry Electronics Team

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