News

How do I apply for rail strike compensation? Delay Repay program refunds explained

Big national rail strikes are taking place next week and the government and rail operators have made the latest announcements about whether – and how – you can get refunds. Here’s what we know so far

People can demand compensation if they are disturbed during the national rail strike
People can demand compensation if they are disturbed during the national rail strike

Britain’s biggest train strikes in decades take place on June 21, 23 and 25, with millions warned not to travel.

Workers on 13 lines and Network Rail are stepping down over wages, working conditions and the shedding of 2,500 maintenance jobs.

Services on June 22nd and 24th are also likely to be suspended as businesses recover.

Whether you support the strike or not, everyone agrees that it will cause widespread chaos – the purpose of the strike is to get employers to sit up and take notice.

They do have claims for compensation, however, and these seem to have been made a bit more generous for season ticket holders.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps confused things a bit by claiming the process would be “automatic” when (as far as we can tell) it is not. But there are still refunds for delays.

We’ve got industry and government connoisseurs on the phone to get the best possible picture of what you’re entitled to.

Can I get a train strike ticket refund?

Yes. If you bought an advance ticket or have a season ticket, you can get at least part of your money back.

This is done through the “Delay Payback Scheme”, which pays out a certain amount if the train is more than 15 or 30 minutes late (depending on the operator).

You should also be able to get a refund on a walk-up ticket, but why you’re buying one on the day of the biggest strike in a generation is a bit beyond us.







Refunds are made through the “Delay Repay” system
(

Picture:

(Getty Images)

How do I apply under Delay Repay?

It varies very slightly depending on the operator.

In general, you need to write to the train company a photo of your ticket, season pass or receipt and the details of the train you wanted to take.

You must do this separately for each delay.

You can apply online or by post – search for ‘Delay Repay’ and the name of your train operator and you should find it.

What is my refund for a presale, off-peak or anytime ticket?

Under the most generous scheme, Delay Repay 15, you’ll get 25% of the one-way fare you paid if you’re 15-29 minutes late.

50% for a delay of 30-59 minutes and 100% for a delay of 60 minutes or more.

For return tickets, it is a calculation based on whether one or both legs of your journey were delayed.

However, round trip, if a route is more than 120 minutes late, you will get 100% of the total paid ticket price.

You can also get a refund or change your ticket date if you decide not to travel of your own accord.

However, that only applies if you choose not to travel because your particular train has been “cancelled, delayed or rescheduled,” according to National Rail Inquiries.







50% for a delay of 30-59 minutes and 100% for a delay of 60 minutes or more
(

Picture:

(Getty Images)

What is my refund for a season ticket?

Season passes use a formula where the price of a “single ride” is a percentage of what you paid for your entire pass for refund purposes.

As the holder of an annual ticket, you will be refunded 1/464 of the price for each “single journey” that is fully entitled to compensation.

With a monthly ticket it is 1/40 of the price, with a weekly ticket 1/10.

Rail operators have introduced some additional strike day rules that make the system a bit more generous – below.







Season ticket refunds work on a formula
(

Picture:

Photo only via Getty Images)

Will season ticket holders automatically receive strike refunds?

For now, despite Grant Shapps’ claims, it doesn’t look like it.

The transport secretary said: “I have moved to help make this an automated process” to “remove the inconvenience to passengers”.

However, his claim was later contradicted by sources, who suggested season ticket holders would have to apply through the Delay Repay program as usual.

For season ticket holders, however, there appear to be some minor differences.

As part of a one-off rule, season ticket holders can apparently claim 100% of the usual delay reimbursement compensation if they decide not to travel during the three days of the strike – regardless of whether their train is actually cancelled.

This regulation only applies to the strike days themselves, not to the days in between when the trains are still disrupted.







The transport secretary said: “I have moved to help make this an automated process” to “remove the inconvenience to passengers”. We can’t see that’s true
(

Picture:

PA)

Will it be cash or vouchers?

The Rail Delivery Group has informed us that as a season ticket holder you will receive money into your bank account.

If you have purchased an advance ticket you will receive an e-voucher which you can redeem towards the cost of a future train journey.

How soon can I get my money back?

We consulted several sources and could not get any guarantees.

It’s possible that many, many more people than usual are applying for a delayed repayment – so, ironically, payments could be delayed.

Continue reading

Continue reading

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/how-claim-rail-strike-compensation-27255966 How do I apply for rail strike compensation? Delay Repay program refunds explained

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button