“I enjoy lambing a lot, I’m very interested in the sheep and I think it’s just bred into me.”

Over 2,000 Borris Ewes, regarded by their breeders as the Rolls Royce of breeding sheep in the country, are set to be sold at the annual Borris Ewe Sale in Carlow on August 13.

The sale will be the first of three to take place over the next two months, on August 13th and 27th (lambs, pigs and two and three year old ewes) and September 10th (lambs, pigs, two and three year olds). ). -year-old ewes and Cheviot ewes).

Close

Paul Stacey’s Borris Ewes at his farm in Myshall, Co. Carlow. Image: Finbarr O’Rourke

Myshall sheep farmer Paul Stacey is hoping to have 70 of his Borris hoggets ready for the sale his father helped set up 59 years ago.

“My father Tom was a founding member of the Borris Ewe Association and sales.

Close

Paul Stacey on his sheep station. Image: Finbarr O’Rourke

“He was a great man for showing his sheep and that rubbed off on me and my brothers.

“Father won many awards at local shows and was very proud of his herd.

“We are a close-knit association and the sale is for the local growers, but people from all 32 counties come to the sale.

“There is no one among the sheep who does not know what the sale of Borris Ewe is.”

The sale, he says, has been helped in recent years by the involvement of younger people, with children and grandchildren of the original founders all helping to keep it going.

On the first day, 700 lambs are to be sold in the morning, followed by 1,200 pigs and over 100 two- and three-year-olds in the afternoon.

Paul says the number of sheep sold has decreased over the years, although these are good numbers.

Close

Borris Ewes by Paul Stacey. Image: Finbarr O’Rourke

“In the 1980s, when sheep farming was booming in Ireland, around 20,000 Borris ewes were sold by just four breeders in August and September.

“But nowadays the number of sheep is nowhere near what it used to be. Back then there were a lot of sheep in the country, today young farmers are more interested in cattle than in sheep.”

Sales have continued across Covid and last year’s sale was one of the best in a long time, says Paul, and sellers enjoyed “the best ever trading in Hogget ewes”.

“The record price set last year was €450 for an 18 month Hogget. This year we are hoping for the same but it could be difficult at the moment due to the pressure on lamb prices.”

Close

Borris ewes are bred from a Cheviot ewe and a Suffolk ram and Paul says they have the best qualities when it comes to sheep.

Paul and his brother Thomas manage a total of over 500 ewes and operate a “closed herd system”.

“We farm in the foothills of the Blackstairs Mountains and like many sheep farmers I would love to be able to make a living from farming but at the moment that is not possible. “I breed all my own replacement Cheviots. If you keep breeding the black ram with the white ewe, your bloodline will die out, so you need fresh white blood to come through. Many breeders prefer to breed their own ewes to keep the flock cohesive.”

Borris ewes are bred from a Cheviot ewe and a Suffolk ram and Paul says they have the best qualities when it comes to sheep.

Close

Paul Stacey says he really enjoys lambing

“Together they (the two breeds) form the backbone of many of Ireland’s finest herds, they are the Rolls Royce of the country’s breeding sheep.

“Crossbreeding brings added growth, strength and size, and good shape without sacrificing the longevity of the ewe,” he says.

Although Borris Ewes usually lambs unaided, Paul takes time off from his day job at contractor Kavanagh Plant and Agri during the lambing season to ensure everything runs smoothly.

“They usually lamb unaided and the lambs are always great eaters and very lively. Borris ewes are a breed that doesn’t need a lot of work. They are hardy by nature, so lambing is usually smooth.

“I keep my lambing season short and concise and try to get everything done in five weeks.

“I usually start lambing in the last week of March or the first week of April.

“But I really enjoy lambing, I’m very interested in the sheep and I think it’s just bred into me.”

https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/rural-life/i-get-a-great-kick-out-of-lambing-i-take-great-interest-in-the-sheep-and-i-think-its-just-bred-into-me-41898551.html “I enjoy lambing a lot, I’m very interested in the sheep and I think it’s just bred into me.”

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button