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I was told I had ‘fresh flu’, Covid then had appendicitis before discovering the horrifying truth

After spending a week partying during the new week in college, student Georgia Coulson was feeling depressed.

But the 20-year-old also had a fever and as the days passed, her condition worsened.

Math student Georgia Coulson was out partying for the new week, so thought she was tired of it.

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Math student Georgia Coulson was out partying for the new week, so thought she was tired of it.Credit: Mercury
But the 20-year-old's symptoms got worse and worse and she claims she was misdiagnosed three times

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But the 20-year-old’s symptoms got worse and worse and she claims she was misdiagnosed three timesCredit: Mercury
Finally, she made it to the hospital where the doctors immediately took her away for further examination and discovered her body was in septic shock.

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Finally, she made it to the hospital where the doctors immediately took her away for further examination and discovered her body was in septic shock.Credit: Mercury

At first she thought she might have ‘flu‘, which a lot of college students get due to the increased inclusion during the first few weeks of college.

Georgia, from Guilford, Surrey, sought help in September 2021 and announced that she had been fired twice by phone, with doctors saying it appeared she had coronavirus.

A high temperature is a key sign of Covid-19, which may be why her symptoms were initially dismissed.

The math major confirmed she was misdiagnosed for the third time with appendicitis.

By the time Georgia arrived at A&E, doctors noticed that her body was indeed going through a phase of septic shock.

Septic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs when your blood pressure drops dangerously low after an infection, says the NHS.

Sepsis is a dangerous condition, and as it gets worse, it can interfere with blood flow to vital organs like your brain and heart.

It can also cause abnormal blood clotting that leads to small blood clots or ruptured blood vessels.

Georgia said she has been in a coma for 16 days and is now telling her story to let others know about the key symptoms of sepsis.

She said: “I had never heard of sepsis before so I just thought I had an intense version of the newer flu because I was partying a lot.

“I spent three days lying in bed with sweats and colds, fatigue and throbbing pain every time I breathed.

“I called 111 twice and was told it was likely the coronavirus even though I had PCR and lateral flow tests both negative.

“I was hoping it would clear up after a few days but I was worsening by the minute.”

What is sepsis and what are the symptoms you need to know about?

SEPSIS is a life-threatening response to an infection and occurs when your immune system overreacts to an infection and begins to damage your body’s tissues and organs.

It’s the main cause of death from infection around the world – that’s more combined bowel, breast and prostate cancer.

This condition is always triggered by an infection – but it is not contagious and cannot be passed from person to person.

Usually, the culprit is an infection that we all recognize – pneumonia, urinary infection (UTIs), skin infections, including cellulitis, and infections in the stomach, for example appendicitis.

Usually, when a person gets a minor cut, the area around the wound becomes red, swollen, and warm to the touch.

This is evidence that the body’s immune system has started working, releasing white blood cells to the injured site to destroy the bacteria causing the infection.

If you, a loved one, or, in the case of health professionals, their patient feels “severely ill”, does not appear to be himself, and develops any of the following symptoms, an infection should be suspected: septicemia:

– Weak
– Loss of appetite
– Fever and chills
– Thirsty
– Shortness of breath or rapid breathing
– Fast heart beat
– Low blood pressure
– Low urine output

If a person is having these symptoms and they are thought to have had an infection — pneumonia, an abdominal infection, a urinary tract infection, or a wound — sepsis is a possible cause.

She added that at the time, she didn’t realize that a high temperature and shivering were symptoms of sepsis.

Georgia said that being told she might have Covid made her ‘frustrated’ because she took tests to confirm she didn’t have the virus.

She said she would have to go to the hospital herself because the doctors thought she had appendicitis.

Upon arrival, she was unable to stand and was immediately taken outside for further examination.

Georgia said: “I couldn’t stand anymore; I was really sick. My friend had to speak for me because I was too weak.

“Immediately, the nurse said it was not appendicitis and sent me a CT scan and X-ray.

“I was diagnosed with pneumonia and I went into septic shock.

“My blood pressure is very low and I am put on a ventilator in intensive care.

Sepsis spreads so fast that another day at home could cost me my life

Georgia Coulson

“The first night was very emotional and it took a while because my oxygen levels were dangerously low.”

Georgia spent 16 days in a coma and when she awoke she was told she was in fact battling sepsis.

She is still struggling with post-production work after being discharged from the hospital on October 20.

Georgia explains that it’s a long way to recovery and doctors have told her it could take up to a year before she feels normal again.

“At the moment, I am still tired and sometimes my lungs hurt,” she said.

“I am sharing my story to raise awareness about sepsis and urge others to get tested.

“If I had gone to the GP or A&E a few days earlier, it could have been detected more quickly.

“Sepsis spreads so quickly that another day at home could cost me my life.”

Georgia said she didn’t want to be a nuisance because the NHS was already under pressure, which is why she waited until the last second.

She added: “I regret doing it now so I hope my story encourages others to get checked out when they’re not feeling well.”

Georgia has been in a coma for 16 days and is still struggling with the aftermath of her ordeal to this day.

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Georgia has been in a coma for 16 days and is still struggling with the aftermath of her ordeal to this day.Credit: Mercury
The student said she hopes telling her story will help others get tested if they feel unwell.

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The student said she hopes telling her story will help others get tested if they feel unwell.Credit: Mercury

https://www.thesun.ie/health/8308893/told-freshers-flu-covid-appendicitis-terrifying-truth/ I was told I had ‘fresh flu’, Covid then had appendicitis before discovering the horrifying truth

Fry Electronics Team

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