Lifestyle

I’m a first responder and here’s what every parent needs to do before giving their babies new food

A FIRST AID revealed what all parents need to do before encouraging their babies to try new foods.

She calls it the “squish test” and says it’s important to minimize the risk of choking.

The expert lined up six foods to show how easily they can be crushed

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The expert lined up six foods to show how easily they can be crushed
It showed what foods are safe for children who don't have many teeth yet

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It showed what foods are safe for children who don’t have many teeth yet

Mother and CEO of Australian Parents Organisation Education for little heartsNikki Jurcutz, shared a video to tell moms and dads what to do.

She wrote: “With this simple trick you can quickly test whether a food is safe for your child.

“Pull the food between your index finger and thumb to mimic the pressure of a toothless piece of gum chewing on it.

“If the food crushes easily, it’s probably safe to give Bub.

“If it doesn’t bruise easily, you need to modify, replace, or avoid it to minimize that Danger of suffocation.”

She demonstrates how to crumble banana, avocado, egg and cheese slices, all of which are soft and safe for toothless babies.

But when she tries to mash apple and cucumber, it’s much more difficult, so preparing a food for a small child would be different.

However, the mum added: “If you say that, anyone can choke on anything, so knowing what to do is so important.

“When Bub is choking, remember – ‘five to stay alive’.

“Five punches on the back, followed by five punches in the chest until the obstruction is cleared, the ambulance arrives and takes over, or Bub falls unconscious and needs resuscitation.”

Yesterday we shared how she warned parents that some Easter eggs could be more dangerous for young children than others.

She said smaller and harder eggs are a choking hazard, so parents should avoid these for young children.

Larger or hollow eggs are a better option as they can be crumbled into smaller pieces.

The NHS says someone who chokes easily can usually clear the blockage themselves.

You should encourage them to keep coughing to clear the blockage.

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But if coughing doesn’t work, you can do it backstrokes begin.

If you need to perform a backblow for someone who is choking, here’s what the NHS recommends.

  • Stand behind her and slightly to the side. Support your chest with one hand. Lean them forward so the object blocking their airway comes out of their mouth instead of moving further down.
  • Give up to 5 strong hits between your shoulder blades with the heel of your hand. The heel is between the palm and the wrist.
  • Check if the blockage has been resolved.
  • If not, give up to 5 abdominal pushes.
Crushing the food is a great way to check if it's safe for children

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Crushing the food is a great way to check if it’s safe for children

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