Lifestyle

I’m a pharmacist and here are my 8 hay fever hacks…from peeling to petroleum jelly

Hay fever season is in full swing and with it comes red eyes and a runny nose.

That pollen count will increase in the coming days so it is important that the British are prepared.

Pollen levels are expected to rise this week - but there are ways you can prevent symptoms from ruining your day

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Pollen levels are expected to rise this week – but there are ways you can prevent symptoms from ruining your dayPhoto credit: Getty
The pollen charts above show how pollen levels are set to rise across the UK later this week

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The pollen charts above show how pollen levels are set to rise across the UK later this week

East of England, London and the South East all have high pollen loads today, while the rest of the country remains at medium or high loads.

But the high levels seen in the south will spread across the Midlands and north later this week, leaving millions of hay fever sufferers miserable.

pharmacist Marc Donovan The treatment and prevention of hay fever is based on two main principles.

The chief pharmacist at high street retailer Boots said Brits need to both avoid exposure to pollen and lower the histamine levels in their bodies.

Warning to hay fever sufferers as larger pollen bombs will trigger nasty eye problems
Covid or hay fever? How to tell the difference when a pollen bomb explodes

To keep hay fever symptoms at bay, he revealed his top hacks.

1. Stripping

Marc said that one of the easiest ways to prevent pollen from entering your home is to be careful not to transmit it.

“Change your clothes as soon as you get inside. It’s best to take a shower and wash your hair too, as pollen is difficult to remove when wet,” he said.

2. Use petroleum jelly

It turns out that petroleum jelly isn’t just good for chapped lips, and Marc said you can use a product like petroleum jelly around your nose to trap the pollen.

This prevents it from getting up your nose and causing sneezing and other uncomfortable hay fever symptoms.

3. Check the forecast

“If the pollen count is high, allergies are likely to be worse at that time.

“So it’s important to keep an eye on the Met Office’s website on a daily basis to monitor pollen levels so you can act quickly if necessary,” Marc said.

4. Close window

While temperatures could rise as spring turns to summer, Marc said closing windows can help prevent hay fever symptoms.

He explained, “If you go out during the day or stay indoors, make sure your car and house windows are closed to minimize pollen levels on high pollen count days.”

5. Watch the clock

Pollen counts are usually lowest around noon.

Marc said if you suffer from hay fever, this is the best time to get some fresh air – without coming home with red eyes and a runny nose.

6. Buy an air purifier

Marc said that having an air purifier in your home is a great way to clean the air.

“Putting it in the bedroom at night can filter out allergens and pollutants like dust and pollen from your bedroom,” he says.

7. Use medication

Most people who suffer from hay fever are usually covered in it remedyand Marc said there are a lot of ancillary products that you could benefit from

He said: “From tablets to nasal sprays, you can always speak to your pharmacist to find out which products are right for you.

“If over-the-counter remedies aren’t effective, talk to your GP or visit our Boots Online Doctor who offers a hay fever treatment service.”

8. Spot the difference

Coronavirus infections have been declining in recent months and with the less severe Omicron variant, many people are experiencing mild symptoms similar to those of a cold and even hay fever.

Marc said the most common hay fever symptoms are sneezing, a runny or stuffy nose, itchy, red, watery eyes, or an itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears.

The NHS recently updated its symptom list after free testing was discontinued.

The most common signs are a high temperature, new cough, loss of taste and smell, pain, tiredness, and a stuffy or runny nose.

Sneezing isn’t listed and Marc says people with hay fever don’t usually have a high temperature.

He said: “Sneezing is not a symptom of Covid-19 and itchy, watery eyes or an itchy throat are rare, and hay fever does not cause a high temperature.

“Make sure you’re aware of the additional nine new Covid-19 symptoms so you can better differentiate. A full list of Covid-19 symptoms can be found on the NHS website.”

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https://www.thesun.ie/health/8672826/pharmacist-hay-fever-hacks-stripping-off-vaseline/ I’m a pharmacist and here are my 8 hay fever hacks…from peeling to petroleum jelly

Fry Electronics Team

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