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Inside Indonesia’s £24 billion plan to move the sinking capital Jakarta 1,200 miles away to a remote island inhabited by jungle tribes

Indonesia’s sunken capital will be moved 1,200 miles away to a remote island inhabited by jungle tribes in a £24 billion project.

At least 20,000 people from the country’s 21 indigenous groups living in the marked area will be forced to make way to Jakarta, which is estimated to take more than two decades to build.

What the new city CGI might look like

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What the new city CGI might look like
Plans include a 150-meter-tall presidential palace

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Plans include a 150-meter-tall presidential palace
It will see 1.5 million of Jakarta's 10.5 million population displaced

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It will see 1.5 million of Jakarta’s 10.5 million population displaced

As the city continued to sink, the Indonesian parliament planned to relocate the city to a jungle island in East Kalimantan province on the Indonesian part of Borneo, which the country shares with Malaysia and Brunei.

About 1,200 miles from the current capital, the island will be named Nusantara after undergoing a £24 billion transformation.

The proposed city would be about 216 square miles, but a total of nearly 1,000 square miles have already been earmarked for the project — with additional land set aside for potential future expansion.

It will see 1.5 million of Jakarta’s 10.5 million population displaced as projections suggest that by 2050, around 95% of North Jakarta will be submerged.

Early plans for the new capital depict a utopian design aimed at creating an environmentally friendly “smart” city, but very few details have been confirmed.

However, it will see new government offices and a 150-meter-tall presidential palace built.

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But environmental critics in the new capital have warned it could harm ecosystems in the region, where mining and palm oil plantations have threatened tropical forests. , home to Borneo’s endangered species, including orangutans.

“The construction of a new capital city is not merely a physical move by government offices,” President Joko Widodo said before parliament approved the plan earlier in the day, President Joko Widodo said. this month.

The President added: “The main objective is to build a smart new city, a new city that is competitive on a global level, building a new locomotive for the transformation towards an Indonesia based on innovation. new and technology-based green economy”.

Plans to start construction in 2020 have been thwarted by the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.

The development of this area will take place in several stages until 2045.

“The new capital has a central function and is a symbol of the national identity, as well as a new economic hub,” Planning Minister Suharso Monoarfa told parliament after the bill was passed. into law.

Initial relocation will begin between 2022 and 2024, with priority routes and ports allowing access, with some projects operating as public-private partnerships, the Finance Ministry said. .

‘CRITICAL POSITION’

Plans to move the government away from the megalopolis of Jakarta – plagued by chronic congestion, flooding and air pollution – have been floated by several presidents, but none have come this far.

Jokowi, as president, first announced its plans in 2019, but progress has been delayed by Covid.

The new city has a name of his choosing – Nusantara, a Javanese term for the Indonesian archipelago

It will strengthen supply chains and place Indonesia “in a more strategic position in world trade routes, investment flows and technological innovation,” the government said in a statement.

But the plans were quashed by the Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Islands (AMAN), arguing that the laws allowing the move out of Jakarta did not provide enough protection for the community’s land rights.

“The project will cause problems such as customary land confiscation and criminalization of indigenous peoples as they try to protect their rights,” said Muhammad Arman, Director of Advocacy, Law and Policy. AMAM’s human rights, told AFP.

“They will also lose their traditional jobs like farming.”

The project will cost £24 billion and will take more than two decades to complete

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The project will cost £24 billion and will take more than two decades to complete
It is estimated that a third of Jakarta could be submerged by 2050

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It is estimated that a third of Jakarta could be submerged by 2050

https://www.thesun.ie/news/8288335/indonesia-move-sinking-jakarta-remote-island/ Inside Indonesia’s £24 billion plan to move the sinking capital Jakarta 1,200 miles away to a remote island inhabited by jungle tribes

Fry Electronics Team

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