Monkeys who have their own streaming services as watching videos can help them in the wild

Experts from the University of Glasgow believe that sound and video with a touchscreen can let them enjoy rain sounds, music, traffic sounds, videos of worms or even underwater scenes

monkeys
Monkeys could soon get their own video channels

Monkeys could soon mimic humans by using their own streaming services.

The scientists set up a computer system that provided audio and video with a touch screen so they could choose between the two.

According to experts from the University of Glasgow, they should be stimulated in a similar way as in the wild.

dr Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas from the School of Computing Science said: “Previously we have examined how they interact with video content and audio content, but this is the first time we have had the opportunity to choose between the two.

“Our results raise a number of questions worth investigating further to help us build effective interactive enrichment systems.”

Researchers have studied three white-faced saki monkeys at Korkeasaari Zoo in Helsinki, Finland.

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A sound device for a group of saki monkeys at Korkeasaari Zoo in Helsinki
(

Picture:

Roosa Piitulainen / Aalto University)

A small computer was placed in a wood and plastic tunnel that was inside her case.

The monkeys could enjoy rain sounds, music, traffic sounds, videos of worms, underwater scenes, or abstract shapes and colors.

They triggered a video or sound by passing through infrared rays and could listen or watch for as long as they wanted.

The device recorded what they saw and heard, and found that the saki monkeys’ interactions were mostly brief, lasting only a few seconds.

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dr Hirskyj-Douglas added, “Previously we looked at how they interacted with video content and audio content, but this is the first time we’re offering the ability to choose between the two.”

The researchers found that the monkeys responded more strongly to visual stimuli than to auditory ones.

In 2007, The Mirror reported how a grieving gorilla named Nico coped with the death of his partner Samba by watching TV.

Ian Turner, then zookeeper at Longleat Safari Park, Wilts, said: “Planet of the Apes really gets him going too.”

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/monkeys-streaming-services-watching-vids-27214075 Monkeys who have their own streaming services as watching videos can help them in the wild

Fry Electronics Team

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