Mystery surrounding ‘perfectly aligned’ holes punched in the seabed 1.7 MILES under the Atlantic

MYSTERIOUS holes drilled 1.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean have stunned scientists.

Photos show that the dents punched into an otherwise flat and sandy surface combine into clean, straight lines.

An underwater vehicle controlled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tripped over the unusual perforations over the weekend

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An underwater vehicle controlled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tripped over the unusual perforations over the weekendCredit: NOAA

A remotely operated underwater vessel controlled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) stumbled on the unusual perforations over the weekend.

The crew of the Okeanos Explorer said the holes looked artificial, but couldn’t provide any further explanation as to how they got there.

Okeanos studies the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a largely unexplored area of ​​seafloor that hosts a vast submerged mountain range.

“We observed several of these sublinear rows of holes in the sediment,” reported NOAA Ocean Exploration.

“These holes have previously been reported from the region, but their origin remains a mystery.

“Although they look almost man-made, the small piles of sediment around the holes make them look like they were dug out by… something.”

The July 23 dive visited the summit of an underwater volcano north of the Azores and reached depths of 1.7 miles.

Okeanos is equipped with a remote controlled camera to safely record discoveries.

The crew will map the seabed and study coral and sponge communities in the uncharted region.

NOAA frequently live streams its remote dives conducted from a surface vessel.

The agency posted photos of the discovery on social media, encouraging followers to speculate on the origins of the holes.

“I wonder if there might be a company doing seabed sampling,” one user wrote on Facebook.

“That could explain the straight lines and spacing of the holes. Especially after seeing others in the area.

Another wrote: “Boost! Fresh water from a land spring bubbles up? Like there’s a rock down there that allows the flowing water to break through in this linear fashion.”

And a third said, “Maybe some kind of crab.”

Other people jokingly suggested that the holes might have been left by aliens.

“I’m not saying it was the aliens…but it was the aliens,” read a meme shared by a Facebook user.

The most likely explanation seems to be sand falling through gaps in the underlying rock.

One user commented, “To me it looks like the sediment is falling through or water is pouring out of a crack in a geological shelf or cave ceiling.

“I suspect that either an old coral or a sedimentary rock structure beneath it has a cavity for which material is leached further away.

“I would start to see if there are any caves or deformations in the seabed.”

The mid-Atlantic chain stretches over 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world.

It stretches the north-south length of the Atlantic Ocean and remains largely unexplored as most of it is submerged.

The section of rocky terrain is the scene of frequent earthquakes and hydrothermal vents, which form when magma rises to the seafloor.

Photos show that the dents punched into an otherwise flat and sandy surface combine into clean, straight lines

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Photos show that the dents punched into an otherwise flat and sandy surface combine into clean, straight linesCredit: NOAA
NOAA uses remote-controlled vehicles to explore the ocean floor

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NOAA uses remote-controlled vehicles to explore the ocean floorCredit: NOAA

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https://www.thesun.ie/tech/9161338/mystery-perfectly-aligned-holes-seafloor-atlantic/ Mystery surrounding ‘perfectly aligned’ holes punched in the seabed 1.7 MILES under the Atlantic

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