Nasa Artemis 1 has ‘second chance’ to launch in just 3 days after engine fiasco stalled launch

NASA’s largest rocket to date is not yet on the ground.

The Space Launch System (SLS) can still fly this week after a host of obstacles slowed the lunar test yesterday.

Nasa's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard the mobile launch vehicle at Kennedy Space Center on Monday

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Nasa’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard the mobile launch vehicle at Kennedy Space Center on MondayPhoto credit: The Mega Agency

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The much-anticipated Artemis 1 mission was scheduled to launch Monday and send an unmanned Orion capsule to the moon on SLS.

However, the Kennedy Space Center mission team in Florida scrubbed the flight hours before launch after encountering a problem with one of the engines.

Despite the setback, the rocket could fly into space for the first time on Friday, according to NASA.

“Friday is definitely in play,” Artemis mission manager Mike Sarafin said during a press conference on Monday.

“We just need a little time to look at the data. But the team is gearing up for 96-hour reuse.”

The Artemis 1 mission is designed to test the SLS system ahead of a manned launch to the moon in 2024.

Once the rocket reaches Earth orbit, the Orion capsule will detach and perform a loop of the Earth satellite.

Orion will carry scientific instruments and sensors to collect data about the flight.

It is hoped that one day SLS will be used on missions to Mars and beyond.

Monday’s scrub was the result of a problem with one of the four RS-25 engines in the core phase of the SLS.

The engine’s cooling system failed during the countdown, forcing Nasa to postpone the launch to a later date.

Previously, the launch had been postponed after stormy conditions and a leak later found to be mild enough for the flight to continue safely.

Currently, the space agency has identified September 2 or 5 as the two most likely dates for a retry.

Meanwhile, Nasa engineers are working around the clock to fix the problem that brought the spacecraft to the ground.

the first analyzes brought good news.

“At the moment the signs do not point to an engine problem,” said Sarafin.

“It’s in the breather system that thermally conditions the engines,” he added.

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson has stressed the importance of getting the unmanned test right and not launching until it is.

He said Monday: “We’re not starting until it’s right.”

US astronaut Stan Love admitted that Nasa still doesn’t know exactly what the problem was.

Love added, “We need to take a deep breath and wait for another opportunity.”

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Corresponding Florida todayUp to 500,000 went to Cape Canaveral in Florida to watch Monday’s launch.

Those viewers may have to wait eight weeks to see the flight if Nasa misses both of its early September dates.

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https://www.thesun.ie/tech/9328552/nasa-artemis-1-second-chance-launch-engine-launch/ Nasa Artemis 1 has ‘second chance’ to launch in just 3 days after engine fiasco stalled launch

Fry Electronics Team

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