Nasa unveils a new image of the asteroid crash that shows a huge blue dust explosion

NASA has just released a stunning image of a comet-like blue dust tail from its DART mission.

On Thursday, Nasa shared a new photo from its DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) mission.

NASA has just released a stunning image of a comet-like blue dust tail from its DART mission

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NASA has just released a stunning image of a comet-like blue dust tail from its DART mission

The mission, carried out in September, involved a spacecraft smashing into a large asteroid called Dimorphos.

Since the mission’s completion, Nasa has examined images taken with its Hubble Space Telescope of both the collision and its aftermath.

“Repeated observations by Hubble over the past few weeks have allowed scientists to paint a more complete picture of how the system’s debris cloud has evolved over time,” Nasa said on its website.

In this latest photo, Nasa revealed that two dust tails were ejected from the Didymos-Dimorphos asteroid system after the crash.

This ejected material, also known as “ejecta,” has expanded and faded in brightness over time after impact.

Images suggest the second tail formed sometime between October 2nd and 8th.

The US space agency stated that the double tail detected was an “unexpected development”.

However, similar behavior can sometimes be observed in comets and active asteroids.

A secret

The space agency said there are many factors that need to be investigated in relation to the second comet-like tail.

“The northern tail is newly developed,” said NASA. “In the coming months, scientists will be looking more closely at the Hubble data to determine how the second tail evolved.”

“There are a number of possible scenarios that the team will be investigating,” the agency added.

The mission

NASA’s DART mission was first launched on November 23, 2021.

The spacecraft launched from Vandenberg Space Force Base in Santa Barbara County, California.

The impact between the vehicle and the space rock was recorded at exactly 7:14 p.m. EST on September 26, 2022.

Nasa’s experiment hopes to solidify a method of protecting Earth from future asteroids.

According to Nasa, there are currently no asteroids larger than 140 meters in diameter known to be on a collision course with Earth for the next 100 years.

https://www.thesun.ie/tech/news-tech/9602083/nasa-image-asteroid-crash-blue-dust-explosion/ Nasa unveils a new image of the asteroid crash that shows a huge blue dust explosion

Fry Electronics Team

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