Nasa unveils ‘never-before-seen’ Jupiter photo – including storm ‘big enough to engulf Earth’

NASA captured a stunning image of Jupiter – and it’s like nothing you’ve seen before.

Captured by the new James Webb Space Telescope, the stunning snapshot shows a massive storm swirling in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

Jupiter in glorious new detail - including the planet's megastorm at bottom right

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Jupiter in glorious new detail – including the planet’s megastorm at bottom rightImage Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, Jupiter ERS Team; Image editing by Judy Schmidt

NASA’s JWST has been capturing stunning images from space for weeks.

But it also captured some spectacular images of Jupiter in infrared light – normally invisible to the human eye.

The space telescope’s near-infrared camera (NIRCam) is revealing Jupiter’s hidden secrets in stunning detail by combining multiple images into one.

We can see its auroras stretching to high altitudes over the North and South Poles.

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And nebulae swirling around the poles are also visible.

“To be honest, we didn’t really expect it to be that good,” said Professor Mike de Pater, a planetary astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley.

“It’s really remarkable that we can see details on Jupiter.

“Together with its rings, tiny satellites and even galaxies in one picture.”

Discover it!

The image also features Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot, a massive storm seen at lower left.

It appears white in this image because it reflects a lot of sunlight.

“The brightness here indicates high altitude,” said Webb scientist Heidi Hammell.

“So the Great Red Spot has haze at high altitude, as does the equatorial region.

“The numerous bright white ‘spots’ and ‘streaks’ are very likely high-altitude cloud cover from condensed convection storms.”

At about 10,160 miles wide, Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is the largest storm in the solar system.

This corresponds to about 1.3 times the diameter of the earth.

Winds on the edge of the cyclone will peak at around 268 miles per hour – faster than the fastest wind speed on Earth on record (253 miles per hour).

secluded

The James Webb Space Telescope was launched in December 2021, but its first images were not released until July 2022.

It is the successor to NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and is tasked with studying the early Universe.

This is accomplished by observing the light from the very first stars and galaxies formed after the Big Bang.

It’s now orbiting about a million miles away and is set to capture many more images of the wonders of space – before beaming them back to scientists here on Earth.

And scientists hope some of this data could help find distant planets where life is possible.

This image shows some of the most exciting parts of the Jupiter snapshot

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This image shows some of the most exciting parts of the Jupiter snapshotImage Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, Jupiter ERS Team; Image editing by Judy Schmidt

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https://www.thesun.ie/tech/9294094/nasa-jupiter-jwst-great-red-spot-storm-photo-infrared/ Nasa unveils ‘never-before-seen’ Jupiter photo – including storm ‘big enough to engulf Earth’

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