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Pope Benedict ‘turns a blind eye’ to child sex abuse

Former pope Benedict XVI failed to take action against priests accused of molesting children during his time as archbishop of Munich, an investigation into the archdiocese has uncovered.

Attorney Martin Pusch said his investigation by law firm Westpfahl Spilker Wastl uncovered four cases in which investigators “come to the conclusion” that Benedict, then known as Josef Ratzinger, ” could be charged with misconduct”.

Benedict has denied the allegations. But the poll results were described as “the fall of a monument”between what Time described as “a growing scandal of historical sexual abuse in the German Catholic Church”.

‘Close eyes’

Benedict was head of the Catholic Church from 2005 to 2013, after serving as archbishop of Munich from 1977 to 1982. The investigative report alleges that during his tenure in the southern city, Priests are allowed to continue to function in church roles after being accused of abuse. .

Investigators found “two cases where the perpetrator insulted while he was in office” but “was allowed to continue his pastoral work without limitation,” he said. Sky News reported.

A “convicted cleric outside Germany” was also “put into service in Munich even though Ratzinger knew his history”, the broadcaster continued.

And “a priest suspected of being a pedophile was transferred to Munich for therapy in 1980 – a transfer approved by Ratzinger”. The priest was then “allowed to continue his ministry – a decision the Church says was made by someone else – and was found guilty of molesting a boy in 1986”.

The exploratory report, released on Thursday, challenges what the authors describe as Benedict’s “astonishing” claim that he was unaware of some of the cleric’s crimes at the time. Investigators pointed to other suggestive evidence, including “records showing that Benedict was present at a meeting at which one of the cases was discussed, and reporting it to the then-Pope now John Paul II,” said. walkie talkie.

The report also alleges 94-year-old Benedict is unwilling to “reflect on his actions and roles or at least take responsibility” for his watch failures.

In a particularly damning finding, he is said to have “perpetuated a culture of trivialization and apathy” to the abuse of children by his own clerics.

“The terrifying phenomenon of cover-up needs to be examined,” said Marion Westpfahl, one of the report’s authors.

‘Tower of Lies’

The German Catholic Church has been affected by a series of damaging statements about the conduct of its clergy.

The report was commissioned by the Church as part of an effort to confront a long-covered history of child sexual abuse. Investigators have identified 235 suspected perpetrators in the Church, including 173 priests and nine deacons.

The Telegraph said the findings made for “astonishing reading”. Christoph Klingan, Munich’s general representative, told the newspaper he was “emotional and embarrassed” by the conclusion.

“One of the most striking things” about the report, The Times said, is “the tone it gives to Benedict,” who “was, at least nominally, the pinnacle of religious authority. earthly virtues to 1.3 billion people”.

Survivors of Catholic clerical sexual abuse in Germany have welcome exploratory findings like “the fall of a monument,” says Irish Times.

“This tower of lies, erected to protect Cardinal Ratzinger, Pope Benedict, has collapsed,” said Matthias Katsch of survivors group at Germany’s Eckiger Tisch.

https://www.theweek.co.uk/news/world-news/955488/pope-benedict-accused-turning-blind-eye-child-sexual-abuse Pope Benedict ‘turns a blind eye’ to child sex abuse

Fry Electronics Team

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