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Rolling Stones recall The Beatles, rifts and drugs in new BBC series about their 60 years

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They’ve been one of the biggest bands in the world for decades, and their gigs are still huge rock’n’roll events even after 60 years.

So it’s no surprise that the Rolling Stones have had a number of stories to tell over the years.

Following the death of Charlie Watts last year, his bandmates Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood sat down for rare in-depth interviews, with the drummer fondly remembered. dear. Maybe they’ve been nearing the end of the year, and perhaps time is no longer on their side, but somehow the Stones’ travels still feel like a “non-stop moving”, like Keith speak.







Rolling Stones members including Charlie (centre right) passed away last year
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Picture:

BBC / Mercury Studios / Steven Klein)

The BBC’s My Life as a Rolling Stone begins with an episode of Mick Jagger’s profile at 9.30pm on Saturday, on BBC2 and continues through July as part of the BBC’s 60th Rolling Stones programme.

All four episodes about Mick, Keith, Ronnie and Charlie will be available to watch from Saturday
on BBC iPlayer. The Stones will also provide the newest generation of fans with musical satisfaction as they perform the BST Festival in London’s Hyde Park on Sunday, July 3.

To celebrate, here are some of their memorable moments in the band’s own words…

Walking on the road of 60 years







The Rolling Stones in the 1960s
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Picture:

Michael Ochs Archives)

Keith: “In order to do that in the long run, Mick and I look at everything and think, ‘We have to do something right. I do not know what it is.

“The idea of ​​people changing in 60 years is like ‘Whoa!’. The thing is non-stop, it’s like a juggler.

“God knows what I would have done if I hadn’t done this. My wildest nightmare.

“Really, all you want to do is play music and try to perfect it and tighten the band.

“Not many people have the opportunity to do this with thousands of people, you know, as a job.

“When you give each other that respect, it’s so touching.

“Music is such a resilient thing and sometimes I think, oh my god, that’s the only thing we have that we can count on.

“I gave up years ago trying to figure out why and how it works. I find the best fix is ​​to put it in a room and go ‘1,2,3,4’ and any problems go away. “

Charlie Watts, who passed away last year







Tributes paid to Rolling Stones member Charlie Watts in upcoming series
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Picture:

BBC / Mercury Studios / Mark Seliger)

Mick: “I miss Charlie on so many levels. Like, I don’t want to play with him this new groove and I want to say how badly England did in the test match yesterday. You know, I miss him so much.”

Keith: “I am still dealing with it. Charlie is the engine. The best drummer England has ever produced. People like Charlie Watts are hard to pocket. They don’t make money for people like Charlie. He’s a completely unique guy. ”

Ronnie: “When Charlie passed, we were very worried. We have the spirit of Charlie playing with us
anytime.

“One word – specific. Clothes have a tissue paper between every shirt, every sock, every pantyhose, every jacket. Primitive will be the word. Not something out of place. “

Mick as a forerunner and leader







Mick Jagger strung his stuff during a performance
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Picture:

PA)

Mick: “I am not afraid to control situations. I’m not a control freak. That must be really boring. Someone has to control a factory like this.

“It’s not just about the music. In a way, I’m representing the band – to make sure they don’t get fouled.

“One of my big jobs is being ostentatious. I mean, it really is. That’s my job for two hours – to make people feel comfortable and give everyone a pleasant experience so they have a great evening. That’s what I think about my role.

“I am so lucky that I can still sing the old notes [as] when I was 19 years old but I didn’t have a great voice. No problem. It does its job. “

Ronnie on Mick: “He is more controlling and organized than he knows. It’s just what he was built to do. He wants to see this ship sail, you know. He knows what he wants and you know when he does, because he starts responding and starts singing and it’s ‘Voom, voom, voom’. ”

Keith on Mick : “He is the best front man in the business. He’ll go up there and make his stuff and put it on you and he means it. What you see is what you get, you know. I mean there are loads of aspects and differences about him but he really is a respectable man, you know… under all that crap. Haha. ”

Drug







The band is still going strong after 60 years
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Picture:

Liverpool FC via Getty Images)

Mick: “Everyone took too much medicine back then [in the 1970s]. The band was supposed to be in rehab for a year, including me. But you take the coarse with the fine. ”

Keith: “Hard things are not called hard things for nothing and you better work hard enough to solve it.”

Ronnie: “In the crazy days, it got out of hand when it was the base pipeline. I used to wear it to parties and thought it was the coolest thing ever. It got to the point where it wasn’t funny anymore.

“It is very dangerous to go up by that pipe. You will do anything for it.

“Mick said, ‘Do you need a little help?’ and I said, “Sure, I’ll try.” It was my first detox. After years of doing it, your body thinks it needs it but I can’t handle it anymore. That was my beginning when I saw the light. “

In 1967, arrested for acid possession after a party at Keith’s mansion in Redlands







Keith Richards has his say in new BBC series
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Picture:

BBC / Mercury Studios)

Mick: “When you get hit with acid and get caught, it’s very weird. It’s not fun to be splashed with acid – being splashed with acid is really cruel. It’s a complete waste of everyone’s time. B ***** ks, basically. ”

In 1977 was arrested for possession of heroinin Toronto and was threatened with 20 years in prison

Keith: “I think the reason I joined was how to deal with popularity and pressure. I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone but it’s an old world and sometimes you need something to erase it.

“It was in Canada that I realized that I was endangering the band. If they’re going to take me away, it’s goodbye.

“If I want to get out of this and not [go] Frozen turkey in prison. I’ll go clean up. “

The Beatles







The Beatles discussed on the new Rolling Stones
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Picture:

Nice pictures)

Keith: “They have been cleaned up by their manager to make them more palatable to the public, otherwise they are exactly like us.
yes, filthy pigs!

“We are working for clubs in London. The Beatles had a hit with Love Me Do and a great record! Our job is to be the leading blues and rhythm band in London. We have managed that but we have no idea of ​​progress beyond that stage.

“We were jealous. They are doing what we want. They got it – they can make records. The holy grail is for creating records. Without The Beatles, the Stones would never have been there. We would never be in a recording studio without them. “

Ronnie joins







Ronnie recalls when he joined the famous band
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Picture:

BBC / Mercury Studios)

Ronnie: “One night, I was sitting on this sofa and Mick Taylor was there and Mick Jagger was there too. At one point, Taylor leaned over to Jagger and said: ‘I’m leaving the band. And I’m going right now’.

Mick asked if I would join and I said: ‘I thought you would never ask.’ My feet never touched the ground in years.

“I felt like coming home when I joined the band. Keith has found his brother.”

Keith: “Ronnie is my wonderful life partner. He’s a funny guy. What he brings is a whole new sense of purpose.”

Keith and his shyness

Mick: “He was terribly shy. When I got to know him as a kid and grew up in his teens, I knew what he was really, really like. Nobody knows him from that era except me, I think. You can see from the interviews he is naturally introverted. I think if you’re an extrovert in the ostentatious business, you’re in a good place. If you’re an introvert, that can make you miserable or upset or anxious.”

Keith: “When it comes to shyness, I really don’t know where to put it. I sometimes think I use it as a weapon. You feel shy in front of crowds and these things.

“I would be happy to do all these filings completely anonymously, but of course, that is not possible. You have to get out there and put yourself out there. I quite like it but I guess my refuge is heroin, it’s drugs and I stay there for as long as possible.”

Mick and Keith’s relationship







An early portrait of the Rolling Stones, circa 1962
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Picture:

Michael Ochs Archives)

Mick: “The problem with bands is that it’s a band. It is a collection of individuals. People say: ‘Oh, brothers are like brothers, it’s like a family.’ It’s not like a family at all. I actually have an older brother and I know what it’s like to have an older brother and it’s not like Keith at all. It is friendship and working together. As in friendship or love, people have roles but those roles change. It is in an altered state so it is never the same.”

Keith: “It was like: ‘Oh, they had an argument. Oh my God.’ I mean it’s all storms in a cup of tea. Before I knew it, Mick and I were fighting to keep everyone happy, you know? So it becomes absurd. No, we are tight”.

Ronnie on healing the rift between Mick and Keith in the 1980s

Ronnie: “I called Mick and said, ‘If I had Keith in 15 minutes, would you talk to him.’ He said: ‘Yes, I will.’ So I prepared the ground. I had to keep this thing immobile, whatever was necessary. There is an impossible bond
broken.”

Schools







The Rolling Stones’ famous tongue and lips logo
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Picture:

PA)

Keith: “As kids, you don’t realize that you’re getting caught up in some aspect of society or being outcast or elevated. I went the middle way and got expelled, which I heartily advise any red-blooded British schoolboy. As far as I know, they put the insult on me and you won’t take it. Maybe then you start questioning other forms of power. There’s always something about being told what to do for no reason at all.”

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/rolling-stones-recall-beatles-rifts-27342389 Rolling Stones recall The Beatles, rifts and drugs in new BBC series about their 60 years

Fry Electronics Team

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