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Stonehenge for what? The answer may be simpler than you think.

Mike Parker Pearson, a professor at University College London who has made important discoveries related to Stonehenge, including the Durrington Wall settlement, said Stonehenge was built at a time of population decline and severely dispersed. There are very few villages and societies, he explains, that are “trying to create a sense of unity and collaboration among their members.

Built on the site of an ancient cemetery, Stonehenge is a “memorial monument,” he said, and an “expression of unity” that drew people together to pursue an endeavour. shared.

However, he said, “People don’t want it to be as simple as an explanation.”

“I was once told by a government minister that it was a great shame, what we were doing, because, of course, we were uncovering mysteries” and “that caused terrible things.” terrible for the number of visitors,” added Parker Pearson.

Much of that mystery is because writing didn’t exist in England until the Romans arrived 2,500 years later – so there’s no written history of Stonehenge and its people, Parker Pearson says.

Wilkin, the manager said, the people of prehistoric England also did not leave any representative images of humans. They have an “almost secretive attitude towards their religion,” perhaps with the intention of “excluding others from that religion,” so their spiritual activities are also undocumented.

Technology may soon help solve some mysteries.

Analysis of stable isotopes – that is, atoms with extra or missing neutrons – is being used to study bones, enamel and food residue on pots and other places to determine if a person ate at the time. what and how far they travel. Tooth enamel contains a kind of chemical record of the climatic and geological conditions a person grew up in, allowing archaeologists to find out how far people have come from their birthplaces and map their genetic makeup. settle and move, explains Wilkin. It also provides insight into their diet.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/17/arts/design/stonehenge-british-museum.html Stonehenge for what? The answer may be simpler than you think.

Fry Electronics Team

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