The clearest footage ever shows Titanic’s anchor and boiler on the seabed after the doomed ship sank 12,500 feet in 1912

THE clearest footage yet of the wreck of the Titanic shows the doomed ship’s massive 15-ton anchor sitting on the seabed.

The amazing images were taken 12,500 feet below the surface and also show the boiler that fell when the liner split in half afterwards 1912 sank on its maiden voyage.

Titanic's bow is seen in the clearest footage ever

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Titanic’s bow is seen in the clearest footage ever
The doomed liner's huge anchor can be seen in the new footage

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The doomed liner’s huge anchor can be seen in the new footagePhoto credit: OceanGate Expeditions
The bow of the doomed liner in high definition

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The bow of the doomed liner in high definitionPhoto credit: OceanGate Expeditions
The newly captured footage has revealed unseen details in high definition

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The newly captured footage has revealed unseen details in high definitionPhoto credit: OceanGate Expeditions

OceanGate Expeditions shared a clip of their footage from the Titanic this week.

The video was recorded at a resolution of 8000 pixels, which allows enlarging certain areas without affecting the image quality.

In the one-minute reel, viewers can see a close-up of the 110-year-old ship’s bow, port anchor and anchor chain, among other parts of the wreck.

“We are seeing new detail in this footage,” said OceanGate team member and veteran Titanic diver Rory Golden geek wire.

“For example, I had never seen the anchor manufacturer’s name, Noah Hingley & Sons Ltd., on the port anchor.

“I’ve studied the wreck for decades and made multiple dives, and I don’t recall ever seeing another image with this level of detail.

“It’s exciting that after so many years we may have discovered a new detail that wasn’t so obvious with previous generations of camera technology.”

The huge anchor is still on the shipwreck’s deck, as is the shackle that was originally attached to the now-collapsed mainmast.

At one point, the ship’s solid bronze winches also come into view, as do its hull and hold.

The company’s five-man submersible transported archaeologists and paying customers to the wreck to film.

Three customers – known as mission specialists – paid just over £215,000 for a seat on the sub.

This new video technology will also help marine archaeologists and scientists more accurately characterize Titanic’s disintegration, said Stockton Rush, president of OceanGate Expeditions.

“By capturing this 8K footage, we can zoom in and still have 4K quality, which is key for big screen and immersive video projects,” he said.

Rush also noted that the colors in the 8K video footage are “phenomenal”.

The next steps for the OceanGate team include expertly reviewing the 8K and 4K footage and then planning another expedition.

Despite the interest, trips to the wreck, including filmmaker James Cameron’s famous dive in 2001, have been controversial.

Experts believe salvage missions and other expeditions over the decades have further weakened the integrity shell.

Landing of boats on the wreck has caused significant damage to the promenade deck.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the ship’s hull and structure are likely to collapse within the next 40 years.

That RMS Titanic was built from the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast and was the largest passenger ship the world had ever seen.

It set out on its maiden voyage from Southampton on April 10, 1912, and was scheduled to arrive in New York City on April 17.

But five days into the voyage, with around 2,224 passengers and crew on board, it collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic.

Six of the watertight compartments at the front of the ship’s hull were breached – five of which were submerged within an hour.

Musicians played for two hours and five minutes while the ship sank.

At 2:20 a.m., the Titanic broke in two, sending all the remaining passengers into the below-freezing waters of the Atlantic.

Paying customers could view the wreck up close

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Paying customers could view the wreck up closePhoto credit: OceanGate Expeditions

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Photo credit: OceanGate Expeditions
OceanGate Expeditions has shared a clip of their first-ever 8K footage of the Titanic

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OceanGate Expeditions has shared a clip of their first-ever 8K footage of the TitanicPhoto credit: YouTube/OceanGate Expeditions
OceanGate footage shows Titanic's anchor chain

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OceanGate footage shows Titanic’s anchor chainPhoto credit: YouTube/OceanGate Expeditions

https://www.thesun.ie/tech/news-tech/9338941/best-titanic-footage-stunning-8k-film/ The clearest footage ever shows Titanic’s anchor and boiler on the seabed after the doomed ship sank 12,500 feet in 1912

Fry Electronics Team

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