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The nomadic “Jesus Born Again” cult could have delivered missing baby Holly 40 years ago

Holly Clouse’s parents were brutally killed in October 1981 after disappearing from Dallas, Texas when the baby Holly was turned over to a church by a religious sect

The nomadic cult Christ's Family was led by a convicted drug dealer named Lightning Amen
The nomadic cult Christ’s Family was led by a convicted drug dealer named Lightning Amen

The cult that handed over “Baby Holly” after she disappeared 40 years ago is thought to be a nomadic group led by “Jesus Reincarnated.”

Holly’s parents were brutally killed in October 1981 when Harold Dean Clouse Junior, 21, and Tina Linn Clouse, 17, were discovered after a dog returned home with a decomposed human arm.

They had moved from Florida in January 1981 but were later found dead, police say, when Junior was beaten to death and Clouse was strangled.

Baby Holly was then given to a church after being left orphaned and taken into care.






Holly Marie Clouse was taken into care as a baby





The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children released an “age history photo” earlier this year claiming what Holly “might look like” now.

However, told Josh Szimhart, who specializes in sects The post The group involved in delivering baby Holly was actually “Christ’s Family,” who spent years walking barefoot across the American Southwest.

The family had a notorious past when a convicted drug dealer known as “Lighting Amen” was found guilty of molesting or molesting a child under the age of 18 in 2003.

And just last week, Texas authorities believed a religious group had taken the girl into their care.






First Assistant Attorney General Brent Webster revealed that baby Holly had been left in an Arizona church

Brent Webster, first assistant attorney general, said the group, which segregated male and female members and was vegan, may have played a key role in baby Holly.

It remains uncertain what interaction the group had as Holly’s new identity was not revealed.

She is believed to be a 42-year-old mother of five who lives in Cushing and was tracked down 1,000 miles away in Oklahoma, where her parents were killed.






Cult followers openly smoked marijuana

Mr Szimhart said Christ’s Family was one of several oddball cults that spent their time in places like Yuma and Arizona – the country highlighted by police – during the 1970s.

The group took the surname “Christ” and lived on handouts, food stamps, and had blankets for makeshift beds.

Szimhart claims he saw many Christ’s Family members in New Mexico in the late 1970s and early 1980s.







Holly Marie Clouse with a picture of her parents
(

Picture:

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children)

He told DailyMail.com: “There were other Jesus-type groups but these people were very distinctive, they said you should smoke marijuana and they wore the white robes.

“They were immediately curious because they were so distinctive. One of the women crouched down to speak to me. She wasn’t wearing any underwear. She was very comfortable with it.

“They didn’t try to recruit me and passively attracted people by their looks and peaceful demeanor.

“A bunch of young people would get curious and find meaning in their words and they would sign up and a month later they would wear the costume.”







A vintage picture of the family in happier times with parents Harold Dean, Tina and baby Holly Marie Clouse
(

Picture:

IDENTIFIER INTERNATIONAL)

The group was not considered violent, instead using the Bible to gain power over people.

Mr. Szimhart added: “The leader micromanaged the whole thing – he was narcissistic in his way of interpreting the Bible by tying the return to Earth to the Bible.

“He came up with this look, the white robes that look like something out of the movies about Jesus, with white headbands tied around their heads.

“Amen used the Bible to gain power over people and spread his grandiose vision of who he thought he was.”

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/us-news/nomadic-jesus-reincarnated-cult-could-27243819 The nomadic "Jesus Born Again" cult could have delivered missing baby Holly 40 years ago

Fry Electronics Team

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