Lifestyle

This is what it looks like when you have an episiotomy during childbirth

Childbirth can be fraught with unexpected challenges, and some women may need a helping hand.

An episiotomy is a scary-sounding but common procedure that involves making an incision at the opening of the vagina.

The picture above shows what it's like to have an episiotomy, where a doctor makes an incision to ease labor. The darker spot in the center would be the baby's head. The lightweight fabric shows the opening of the vagina and where the incision would be made

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The picture above shows what it’s like to have an episiotomy, where a doctor makes an incision to ease labor. The darker spot in the center would be the baby’s head. The lightweight fabric shows the opening of the vagina and where the incision would be madePhoto credit: Instagram/@tinyheartseducation

It is designed to support difficult childbirth and prevent tearing or tearing of the delicate tissue.

An expert revealed what the process looks like and when it should be used in a post on Instagram.

First responder and managing director of a parent organization Education for little heartsNikki Jurcutz said that the procedure is performed with special sharp scissors.

She explained, “Episiotomies are performed to prevent serious damage to a mother’s perineum, buttocks, or anterior compartment [the area where the urethra and clitoris is].

“That’s because heavy tears can significantly affect their future birth and sexual experiences, depending on the location and severity of the tear.”

It is a procedure that is not routinely recommended and there are some special circumstances when it may be performed.

Nikki said one of the top reasons for an episiotomy is when a mother has a vacuum or forceps delivery.

The NHS states this is called an assisted birth and is only used when it is necessary for you and your baby.

Assisted births are required for around one to eight births and can be done if you have been told that you will be unable to attend due to problems such as: high blood pressure.

You can also have an assisted birth if you have concerns about your baby’s heart rate or if the baby is in an awkward position.

Nikki added that an episiotomy can be performed when the mother’s vaginal area shows signs of significant stress, such as: B. “Buttonholes”.

A buttonhole is a tear that can cause a hole between the bowel and the vagina — a rare condition that can occur with vaginal birth.

They might also need an episiotomy, Nikki said, if the baby is stressed and needs to be delivered right away, as it speeds up labor.

If you have shoulder dystocia, where the baby’s shoulder is stuck to your pelvic bone, you may also need an episiotomy.

Before cutting an episiotomy, Nikki said that a doctor or midwife should inject your perineum with a local anesthetic to numb the area and make sure you don’t feel the cut.

She explained: “An episiotomy can only be cut with your consent, so it’s important to speak to your caregiver beforehand about circumstances where you consent and disagree, as it can be easy to say yes or no in the heat of the moment without really thinking about it.

“Generally, episiotomies on a mother’s right hand are cut at an angle of between 30 and 60 degrees.

“Because if an incision is made straight down, there’s a risk that it will go all the way down to the buttocks. It’s also important to realize that episiotomies are not foolproof.

“That means just because you’ve had an episiotomy doesn’t mean you won’t experience another type of trauma in that area.”

She added that if you have an episiotomy, it will be stitched up after the birth.

PAIN RELIEF

Once you get home from the hospital, Nikki said you should keep the area clean and dry and watch for signs of infection.

She stressed that you should change your pad regularly and keep up the pain relief so you don’t experience severe discomfort.

midwife Lesley Gilchrist already stressed that you should not be afraid to take painkillers after childbirth.

“Typically, the pain peaks around the third day and you can take regular painkillers every four to six hours – but no more than eight in 24 hours.

“You should see if you can take ibuprofen and, if possible, postpone it as well.

“Take them even if you think you don’t need them as the pain is difficult to manage.

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“When you’re in pain, you can’t sleep and your body needs that time to recover. A lack of sleep is bad for your mental health, so staying on top of things is really important.”

Lesley said you’ll usually heal well on your own, and you’re much less likely to develop an infection if you’ve had a rapid labor.

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https://www.thesun.ie/health/8524869/what-looks-like-episiotomy-giving-birth/ This is what it looks like when you have an episiotomy during childbirth

Fry Electronics Team

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