Turn down your thermostat by 1°C to reduce demand for Russian gas, regulator says

While Britain only gets about 4% of its gas from Russia, Europe is heavily dependent on the country’s supplies, with Germany and Austria claiming more than 50% of that from the nation

Turning your thermostat down just one degree can also save you £80 a year on your heating bill
Turning your thermostat down just one degree can also save you £80 a year on your heating bill

Households in Britain are being told to turn down their thermostats to reduce Europe’s dependence on Russian gas.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) lists reducing your thermostat by 1 degree Celsius in a 10-point plan reduce gas imports from Russia by a third.

While Britain is just getting around 4% of its gas from RussiaEurope is heavily dependent on the country’s supplies, with Germany and Austria claiming more than 50% of that from the nation.

In response, both countries have vowed to end this dependency this week Russia ‘s invasion of the neighbor Ukraine last week.

This was announced by the IEA Drop the temperature by 1°C would help reduce Russia’s dominance in the market.

It also has financial benefits. Energy experts at uSwitch suggest that lowering your thermostat by just one degree could save you £80 a year on your heating bill.







Countries like Germany and Austria get more than 50% of their gas from Russia
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(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

The IEA also said Europe should not sign new gas supply deals with Russia.

It added that the UK should replace Russian supplies with gas from alternative sources and speed up the roll-out of new wind and solar projects. This alone could reduce gas consumption by 6 billion cubic meters within a year.

Further advice is that the UK should maximize bioenergy and nuclear power generation and adopt short-term tax measures to protect vulnerable electricity consumers from high prices.

It goes on to encourage them faster rollout of heat pumps This would completely eliminate the need for gas and accelerate energy efficiency improvements in buildings.

The head of the IEA said Europe must develop alternatives to Russian energy as soon as possible.

“No one is under any illusions anymore. Russia’s use of its natural gas resources as an economic and political weapon shows that Europe must act quickly to be ready to face significant uncertainties over Russian gas supplies next winter,” said IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol.

“The IEA’s 10-point plan offers practical steps to reduce Europe’s dependence on Russian gas imports by more than a third within a year, while supporting the clean energy transition in a safe and affordable way. Europe needs to quickly reduce Russia’s dominance in its energy markets and ramp up alternatives as quickly as possible.”

In 2021 the European Union imported an average of over 380 million cubic meters (mcm) of gas per day via pipeline from Russia, or around 140 billion cubic meters (bcm) for the entire year.

In addition, around 15 billion cubic meters were delivered in the form of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The total of 155 billion cubic meters imported from Russia accounted for around 45% of the EU’s gas imports in 2021.

The UK consumes relatively little Russian gas, but it still accounts for about 6% of total imports and about 4% of UK gas demand, after almost no growth in 2017, according to an analysis of government data from the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit (ECIU ).

The vast majority of British gas comes from the North Sea and Norway.

Will the Russian invasion push up UK gas prices?

The UK gets less than 5% of its gas from Russia, but its gas prices are affected by fluctuations in world markets.

Currently, US and EU sanctions are hitting Russian trade and driving up gas prices around the world.

The sanctions imposed by Western nations aim to prevent Russia’s banks from doing business in several major economies and paralyze the way Putin is financing the war.

However, experts fear that Putin may decide to retaliate by cutting gas supplies to Europe. If this were to happen, wholesale costs would skyrocket, sending prices skyrocketing everywhere, including the UK.

That would mean another increase energy price cap this October.

Average household bills are already expected to rise by around £700 to around £2,000 in April when the price cap is raised. Fall review would be even higher if whole prices shoot up dramatically again.

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/turn-down-your-thermostat-reduce-26387797 Turn down your thermostat by 1°C to reduce demand for Russian gas, regulator says

Fry Electronics Team

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