News

Ukraine-Russia war: Remaining Ukrainian troops ‘encircled in Mariupol’ but vowing to ‘fight absolutely to the end’

Multiple explosions apparently caused by missiles have struck the western Ukrainian city of Lviv as the country braced for an all-out Russian assault in the east.

t least six people were killed as plumes of black smoke rose over the city after the blasts.

Lviv and the rest of western Ukraine have been less affected by two months of fighting than other parts of the country and have been considered a relative haven.

Close

People take shelter after an air raid siren sounded on April 18, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Lviv’s regional governor Maksym Kozytsky said six people were killed and another eight, including a child, were wounded by four Russian missile strikes.

He said three hit military infrastructure facilities and one struck a tyre shop, and that emergency teams were putting out fires.

Lviv Mayor Andriy Sadovyi put the toll at six dead and 11 wounded, including one child.

Military analysts say Russia is increasing its strikes on weapons factories, railways and other infrastructure targets across Ukraine to wear down the country’s ability to resist a major ground offensive in the Donbas, Ukraine’s Russian-speaking eastern industrial heartland.

The fall of Mariupol, which has been reduced to rubble in a seven-week siege, would give Moscow its biggest victory of the war. But a few thousand fighters, by Russia’s estimate, are holding on to the giant four-square-mile Azovstal steel mill.

“We will fight absolutely to the end, to the win, in this war,” Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal vowed on Sunday.

Close

Smoke is seen on the horizon after Russian missiles struck the area on April 18, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

He said Ukraine is prepared to end the war through diplomacy if possible “but we do not have intention to surrender”.

Many Mariupol civilians, including children, are also sheltering at the Azovstal plant, Mikhail Vershinin, head of the city’s patrol police, told Mariupol television. He said they are hiding from Russian shelling and from any occupying Russian soldiers.

Capturing the city on the Sea of Azov would free up Russian troops for the expected new offensive to take control of the Donbas, in Ukraine’s industrial east.

Close

Firefighters battle a blaze after a civilian building was hit by a Russian missile on April 18, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. At least six people were killed and eight wounded in missile strikes in different areas of the city, according to the governor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

It also would allow Russia to fully secure a land corridor to the Crimean Peninsula, which it seized from Ukraine in 2014, and deprive Ukraine of a major port and its prized industrial assets.

Russia is bent on capturing the Donbas, where Moscow-backed separatists already control some territory, since its attempt to take the capital Kyiv failed.

“We are doing everything to ensure the defence” of eastern Ukraine, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said in his nightly address to the nation.

As for besieged Mariupol, there appeared to be little hope of military rescue by Ukrainian forces any time soon.

Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said on Sunday that the remaining Ukrainian troops and civilians there are basically encircled.

He said they “continue their struggle” but that the city effectively does not exist any more because of massive destruction.

The relentless bombardment and street fighting in Mariupol have killed at least 21,000 people, by Ukrainian estimates.

A maternity hospital was hit by a lethal Russian air strike in the opening weeks of the war, and about 300 people were reported killed in the bombing of a theatre where civilians were taking shelter.

An estimated 100,000 people remained in the city out of a pre-war population of 450,000, trapped without food, water, heat or electricity.

Drone footage carried by the Russian news agency RIA-Novosti on Sunday showed mile after mile of shattered buildings and, on the city’s outskirts, the steel complex from which rose towering plumes of smoke.

Ukrainian Deputy Defence Minister Hanna Malyar described Mariupol as a “shield defending Ukraine”.

Russian forces, meanwhile, carried out aerial attacks near Kyiv and elsewhere in an apparent effort to weaken Ukraine’s military capacity ahead of the anticipated assault on the Donbas.

After the humiliating sinking of the flagship of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet last week in what the Ukrainians boasted was a missile attack, the Kremlin has vowed to step up strikes on the capital.

Russia said on Sunday that it had attacked an ammunition plant near Kyiv overnight with precision-guided missiles, the third such strike in as many days.

Explosions were also reported in Kramatorsk, the eastern city where rockets earlier this month killed at least 57 people at a train station crowded with civilians trying to evacuate ahead of the Russian offensive.

Close

Firefighters battle a blaze after a civilian building was hit by a Russian missile on April 18, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. At least six people were killed and eight wounded in missile strikes in different areas of the city, according to the governor. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

State TV

Two British fighters captured in Ukraine by Russian forces appeared on Russian state TV on Monday and asked to be exchanged for a pro-Russian politician who is being held by the Ukrainian authorities.

It was unclear how freely the two men – Shaun Pinner and Aiden Aslin – were able to talk.

Both spoke after being prompted by an unidentified man.

Both asked British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to help bring them home in exchange for Ukraine releasing pro-Russian politician Viktor Medvedchuk.

Meanwhile, Russia’s brutal invasion of Ukraine may move into its next phase as early as this weekend, US intelligence sources have warned.

After withdrawing to the east and into Belarus following heavy fighting around the capital Kyiv, US officials believe Russia may soon move its military forces back into areas Ukraine.

While it was initially thought Russian forces would only target the Donbas region, two US intelligence officials told NBC News that Washington believes the Kremlin will soon reattempt its all out offensive.

Ahead of this possible offensive, the US announced a further 40,000 artillery rounds and 18 155mm howitzers would be sent to Ukraine.

Following a visit to Kyiv, Boris Johnson also pledged a major transfer of arms and financial aid to Ukraine.

After the meeting, the UK Prime Minister said: “Ukraine has defied the odds and pushed back Russian forces from the gates of Kyiv, achieving the greatest feat of arms of the 21st century.

“It is because of president Zelensky’s resolute leadership and the invincible heroism and courage of the Ukrainian people that Putin’s monstrous aims are being thwarted.I made clear today that the United Kingdom stands unwaveringly with them in this ongoing fight, and we are in it for the long run.

“We are stepping up our own military and economic support and convening a global alliance to bring this tragedy to an end, and ensure Ukraine survives and thrives as a free and sovereign nation.”

Sumy

Meanwhile, Russia’s forces may have pulled back in some parts of Ukraine more than a week ago, but the territorial defence force in the northern Sumy region is training and bracing for further attacks.

Shortly after Russian forces invaded the country on Feb. 24 in what President Vladimir Putin called “a special military operation”, they crossed the border into Sumy, fighting in the streets of towns as they moved towards the capital Kyiv.

Dmytro Zhivitskyi, head of Sumy’s regional and military administration, said at that time there were almost no regular army troops, instead locals took up whatever arms they could find, such as Molotov cocktails.

“According to the Russians, they had plans (to take over Sumy) in three to five days,” Zhivitskyi told Reuters in Sumy on Thursday.

“Apparently they knew that in the territory of Sumy region at that time there were almost no regular (army) troops, and there was only territorial defence.”

Ukrainian forces retook control of the northeastern region on April 8, Zhivitskyi said.

“I think the probability of a (new) attack is high. They are determined and we understand that the number of people in Russia is about 150 million,” he said. “Until the tanks and people run out, they will keep sending people here.”

The Russian invasion has left a trail of death and destruction that has drawn worldwide condemnation and triggered concern about Putin’s broader ambitions.

Russia has dismissed allegations of its troops committing war crimes in Ukraine as fake news.

‘Fight until the end’

The latest comes as Ukraine has vowed to “fight absolutely to the end” in Mariupol where the port’s last-known pocket of resistance is holed up in a sprawling steel plant laced with tunnels.

Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said Ukrainians would keep fighting in the ruined city, as Russian missiles and rockets also battered other parts of the country.

Witnesses reported multiple explosions in the city of Lviv early on Monday.

Lviv and the rest of western Ukraine have been less affected by the fighting than other parts of the country, and the city was considered to be a relatively safe haven.

Lviv Mayor Andriy Sadovyi said that five missiles struck the city and that emergency services were responding.

The fall of Mariupol, which has been reduced to rubble in a seven-week siege, would give Moscow its biggest victory of the war. But a few thousand fighters, by Russia’s estimate, are holding on to the giant four-square-mile Azovstal steel mill.

Close

People take belongings out of a residential building, which was destroyed during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko

“We will fight absolutely to the end, to the win, in this war,” Mr Shmyhal vowed on Sunday.

He said Ukraine is prepared to end the war through diplomacy if possible “but we do not have intention to surrender”.

Many Mariupol civilians, including children, are also sheltering at the Azovstal plant, Mikhail Vershinin, head of the city’s patrol police, told Mariupol television. He said they are hiding from Russian shelling and from any occupying Russian soldiers.

Close

A service member of pro-Russian troops sits on a chair in a street near a building, which was destroyed during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko

Capturing the city on the Sea of Azov would free up Russian troops for the expected new offensive to take control of the Donbas, in Ukraine’s industrial east.

It also would allow Russia to fully secure a land corridor to the Crimean Peninsula, which it seized from Ukraine in 2014, and deprive Ukraine of a major port and its prized industrial assets.

Russia is bent on capturing the Donbas, where Moscow-backed separatists already control some territory, since its attempt to take the capital Kyiv failed.

Close

People walk past a destroyed tank during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko

“We are doing everything to ensure the defence” of eastern Ukraine, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said in his nightly address to the nation.

As for besieged Mariupol, there appeared to be little hope of military rescue by Ukrainian forces any time soon.

Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said on Sunday that the remaining Ukrainian troops and civilians there are basically encircled.

He said they “continue their struggle” but that the city effectively does not exist any more because of massive destruction.

The relentless bombardment and street fighting in Mariupol have killed at least 21,000 people, by Ukrainian estimates.

A maternity hospital was hit by a lethal Russian air strike in the opening weeks of the war, and about 300 people were reported killed in the bombing of a theatre where civilians were taking shelter.

An estimated 100,000 people remained in the city out of a pre-war population of 450,000, trapped without food, water, heat or electricity.

Close

A view shows a street, which was damaged during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko

Drone footage carried by the Russian news agency RIA-Novosti on Sunday showed mile after mile of shattered buildings and, on the city’s outskirts, the steel complex from which rose towering plumes of smoke.

Ukrainian Deputy Defence Minister Hanna Malyar described Mariupol as a “shield defending Ukraine”.

Russian forces, meanwhile, carried out aerial attacks near Kyiv and elsewhere in an apparent effort to weaken Ukraine’s military capacity ahead of the anticipated assault on the Donbas.

After the humiliating sinking of the flagship of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet last week in what the Ukrainians boasted was a missile attack, the Kremlin has vowed to step up strikes on the capital.

Russia said on Sunday that it had attacked an ammunition plant near Kyiv overnight with precision-guided missiles, the third such strike in as many days.

Explosions were also reported in Kramatorsk, the eastern city where rockets earlier this month killed at least 57 people at a train station crowded with civilians trying to evacuate ahead of the Russian offensive.

https://www.independent.ie/world-news/europe/powerful-russian-strikes-hit-western-city-of-lviv-as-kremlin-also-steps-up-assault-on-eastern-ukraine-41562890.html Ukraine-Russia war: Remaining Ukrainian troops ‘encircled in Mariupol’ but vowing to ‘fight absolutely to the end’

Fry Electronics Team

Fry Electronics.com is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@fry-electronics.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button