What are episodic mobility issues if Queen pulls out of state opening due to health?

The Queen did not attend the annual State Opening of Parliament this year. As a statement from Buckingham Palace mentions the Queen’s health concerns, let’s take a look at what episodic mobility issues are

Queen Elizabeth II uses a walking stick as she arrives on the Princess Royal to attend a Thanksgiving service at Westminster Abbey in London to mark the centenary of the Royal British Legion. Picture date: Tuesday October 12, 2021. PA Photo. See PA story ROYAL Legion. Photo credit should read: Arthur Edwards/The Sun/PA ​​Wire
The Queen has been suffering from mobility issues since October last year and has called off many engagements since then

The Queen did not attend the State Opening of Parliament today, leaving the heirs to the throne, Prince Charles and Prince William, to open the new session on her behalf.

This was the first state opening the Queen has missed in decades.

She has only missed two state openings since her coronation, one in 1959 when she was pregnant with Prince Andrew and one in 1963 when she was pregnant with Prince Edward.

It was also recently announced that the Queen will not be hosting any of her annual garden parties at Buckingham Palace.

The monarch has been suffering from mobility issues of late, which has led to her withdrawing from events.

It appears that ongoing mobility problems were also the reason for her absence from today’s opening of Parliament.

A statement from Buckingham Palace said: “The Queen continues to suffer from episodic mobility issues and, in consultation with her doctors, has reluctantly decided that she will not attend the State Opening of Parliament.”

The statement has left many concerned about the Queen’s health and wondering what exactly “episodic mobility issues” are. Here’s everything you need to know.

What are episodic mobility problems?







The Queen’s mobility issues mean that she has only performed light duties in recent months
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Picture:

(Getty Images)

It’s common for older people to struggle with mobility issues, and at 96, the Queen is well past the average retirement age of most countries.

“Episodical” means “occasionally rather than at regular intervals”.

That means we can take the palace’s statement to mean that the Queen occasionally struggles with mobility issues, but doesn’t always have trouble getting around.

This could perhaps explain why the decision for the Queen not to attend the State Inauguration this year was made at such short notice, although the monarch was expected to attend early Monday.

Since when does the Queen have episodic mobility issues?







The Queen was spotted carrying a walking stick during a service at Westminster Abbey in October 2021
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Picture:

PA)

Evidence of the Queen’s episodic mobility issues first began in October 2021, when she was spotted using a walking stick during a service at Westminster Abbey.

It was the first time the Queen has been seen with a cane since 2003, when she was recovering from knee surgery.

In October 2021, the Queen was hospitalized for one night but was back in Windsor the next day.

Since then, however, the Queen’s health issues have prompted her to cancel attending a number of key engagements, including the Cop26 climate change summit and the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph.

In recent months, the Queen has performed only light duties such as virtual audiences.

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https://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/what-episodic-mobility-problems-queen-26923044 What are episodic mobility issues if Queen pulls out of state opening due to health?

Fry Electronics Team

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