What is Halley’s Comet and how is it related to the Orionid meteor shower? – The Irish sun

Described as the most famous comet in human history, HALLEY’S COMET caused public concern in 1910 amid fears that it might strike and bring an end to Earth.

It’s all about Halley’s Comet and its connection to the breathtaking Orionids meteor shower.

The Orionid meteor shower is a sight formed from the remnants of Halley's Comet

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The Orionid meteor shower is a sight formed from the remnants of Halley’s Comet

What is Halley’s Comet?

Dubbed the “most famous comet,” Halley’s Comet was named after the English astronomer Edmond Halley, who studied it reports of comets approaching Earth in 1531, 1607, and 1682.

He concluded that these three comets were in fact the same comet that kept coming back and predicted that the comet would come again in 1758.

Halley did not live to see the comet’s return, but his discovery led to the comet being named after him.

The comet is known as a “periodic” comet, meaning it has an orbital cycle of less than 200 years.

It returns near the earth about every 75 years, so a human can see it twice in a lifetime.

It was last here in 1986 and is expected to return in 2061.

How is Comet Halley connected to the Orionid Meteor?

The Orionid meteor shower is a scientific phenomenon that occurs every October.

According to the Met Office, the Orionids are a vestige of Comet Halley, and at its peak you could see up to 20 shooting stars an hour.

Orionid meteors are known to travel at around 41 miles per second, and under clear, dark skies you have a good chance of spotting one with its sustained, long trail.

The meteor shower is so named because it appears to be emanating from the constellation of Orion, which is one of the most visible and recognizable in the sky worldwide.

How to Observe the Orionids

Falling Orionids are visible to the naked eye from almost anywhere in the country, but the shooting stars are much easier to see when you’re away from the city and city lights.

The best times to watch the shower are just after midnight and just before sunrise, and you should settle down at a dark, rural vantage point about 20 minutes beforehand to give your eyes time to adjust.

Also, remember to wrap up warm before heading out to stargaze in the middle of the night.

And remember, you don’t need binoculars or a telescope, as these are only useful for stationary objects.

https://www.thesun.ie/tech/1692489/halleys-comet-orionid-meteor-shower-connection/ What is Halley’s Comet and how is it related to the Orionid meteor shower? – The Irish sun

Fry Electronics Team

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